hate crimes

The ADL, Arizona and anti-immigrant craziness

Some of the nastiest email I get is on the issue of immigration reform. To read these missives, you'd never know that Jewish groups have been at the forefront of the effort to overhaul a badly broken legal immigration system and offer a path to citizenship for those here illegally.

After Museum Attack, More ‘Lone Wolf’ Violence Feared

06/17/2009
Assistant Managing Editor
In the aftermath of last week’s deadly attack on the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington — an apparent hate crime by a known white supremacist — security analysts and extremism monitors are assessing the growing threat of so-called "lone-wolf" gunmen. The Department of Homeland Security recently released a report detailing how political and economic events, nationally and globally, are fueling extremism, including the mass purchase of firearms. A follow-up report is due soon.

Closure On Crown Heights

08/22/2003
Staff Writer
Calling Lemrick Nelson Jr.'s attack on Yankel Rosenbaum a "horrendous and pathetic act of racial and religious bigotry," a federal judge sentenced him to 10 years in prison (most of it already served) on a civil rights conviction Wednesday. The sentence, handed down exactly 12 years from the day Rosenbaum succumbed to his wounds, will likely spell the end of Nelson's protracted journey through the legal system, an odyssey that has resulted in three trials with numerous twists and turns.

Throw Book At Lemrick, Judge Urged

05/30/2003
Staff Writer
A panel of lawyers working with the family of Yankel Rosenbaum was to formally call on the government this week to seek a stricter sentence for his killer than conventional law allows for civil rights violations. Rosenbaum's brother, Norman, said he was working on a memorandum to the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District, Roslynn Mauskopf, detailing theories that might prevent the expected release of Lemrick Nelson Jr. from prison within a year.

Brother To Push 'Yankel's Law'

05/23/2003
Staff Writer
Jewish leaders, frustrated and pained by the split verdict in the federal retrial of Lemrick Nelson, are searching for a course of action as a clearer picture emerges of the tense deliberations that led to the verdict. Nelson was convicted of civil rights charges in the Crown Heights killing of Yankel Rosenbaum in 1991 but absolved of causing the chasidic man's death.

Jury Pondering Nelson Fate

05/09/2003
Staff Writer
The jury is still out on whether Lemrick Nelson Jr. violated the civil rights of Yankel Rosenbaum during the Crown Heights riots. The panel at Brooklyn Federal Court spent its third day considering the case today after being charged late Wednesday to decide whether hatred of Jews was the motive when Nelson stabbed Rosenbaum in August 1991. After denying any role in the attack, Nelson, now 27, no longer contests that he is the assailant.

Mideast Violence Spills Into Brooklyn

10/06/2000
Staff Writer
Amid signs of a ripple effect of Middle East tensions in New York, Mayor Rudolph Giuliani called on Jewish and Arab leaders to work together to keep the peace here. Some 45 Arab and Jewish leaders gathered at City Hall Wednesday morning in the wake of a series of suspected bias attacks that may be linked to the current violence in Israel and the Palestinian-controlled territories.

Blacks, Jews Join Vs. Crown Hts. Appeal

09/29/2000
Staff Writer
The NAACP's Legal Defense and Education Fund has joined with a coalition of Jewish groups seeking to uphold the federal convictions of two men in the 1991 killing of Yankel Rosenbaum. Defense attorneys for Lemrick Nelson Jr., 25, and Charles Price, 47, are claiming that two Supreme Court decisions, in 1995 and this year, have invalidated the federal statute that led to the convictions and that the government had no jurisdiction in prosecuting the pair.

Bias Eyed In Knifing Of Brooklyn Chasidim

06/16/2000
Staff Writer
The Police Department's Hate Crimes Task Force is investigating a post-Shavuot attack on a group of chasidic men on the Coney Island waterfront early Sunday morning. "We're looking at it as a possible bias crime," said Police Commissioner Howard Safir on Monday. But while the assailants, described by police as Hispanics, were said to have used anti-Semitic slurs during the attack, sources say the investigators are trying to determine whether the attack stemmed from a confrontation between the two groups, or a misunderstanding.
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