God

Pew Study: More Americans Reject Religion, But Believers Firm In Faith

11/02/2015 - 19:00
RNS

Americans as a whole are growing less religious, but those who still consider themselves to belong to a religion are, on average, just as committed to their faiths as they were in the past — in certain respects even more so.

The 2014 U.S. Religious Landscape Study. Courtesy of Pew Research Center

Strands Intertwined And A Yom Kippur Dream

Have you ever had a vivid dream more meaningful than real events? Such was my Yom Kippur dream over fifty years ago.

In the dream, I stood next to my father in Temple Beth El in Asbury Park, NJ. The congregation was reciting the Al Chet "For the sin which we have committed before You" Yom Kippur prayer.

As I recited each sin, I struck my chest lightly as I had been taught. My feet felt the floor slanting down towards the front row. The choir, supported by the organ, was holding one long continuous note. It was my most spiritual moment of the year.

Notes written by Rabbi Levy's father. Courtesy of Michael Levy

Something Out Of Nothing

10/08/2013 - 20:00

The art of living is one of self-creation. The Rabbis of the Talmud teach that when God says in Genesis, “Let us make man,” God is speaking with the royal “we.” But a later chasidic teaching argues that God is speaking to human beings — together we will make you. I will endow you with certain gifts and you must spend your life soul-shaping.

Rabbi David Wolpe

Behind Autism, God: Parents Talk To Rabbis

As a doctoral candidate in developmental psychology doing research on Jewish parents of children with autism, I have found that many mothers and fathers interpret their child’s diagnosis in relation to God.

Frances Victory

The Eternal Conversation

Rabbi Rick Jacobs: 'I think about God every day. I'm not petitioning. I'm not praising. I'm simply sitting with the One.'
03/11/2013 - 20:00
Special To The Jewish Week

Editor’s Note: This article introduces a new column in which Rabbi Alfredo Borodowski, executive director of the Skirball Center for Jewish Learning at Temple Emanu-el and founding rabbi of Congregation Sulam Yaakov in Larchmont, asks leading religious figures, thinkers and activists in Jewish life what they think about God? He began with Rabbi Rick Jacobs, president of the Union for Reform Judaism.

Rabbi Rick Jacobs

How Do Israelis View Secular Humanism?

Rabbi Sivan Maas is the first female secular humanistic rabbi in Israel. In this interview, she explains her role in the community as well as the future of secular humanistic Judaism to Jacques Berlinerblau of Georgetown University.

Am I Doing Hitler's Work?

 

Oops. Not only did I go on a blogging hiatus (thanks to pre-vacation, vacation and post-vacation distractions), but I did so after writing about mine and Ellie’s God problem. Hopefully, attentive readers didn’t conclude that, despairing of God’s goodness, I’d decided to give up writing for The Jewish Week.

Of course some might have been hoping I did exactly that. Like “SG,” a gentleman whose e-mail greeted me upon my return from vacation (a lakefront cottage in Maine, in case you were wondering):

My God Problem

My 8-year-old daughter and I are having a little bit of a God problem lately.

It’s not that we’re unsure whether or not to believe in him; I’m satisfied with leaving it unresolved by being agnostic, and Ellie’s OK with that as well.
It’s not even the “why do bad things happen to good people” issue, because, while the world is outrageously unfair, I don’t think God, if he exists, is micro-managing the daily lives of the world’s almost seven billion people.

The Unity Of God, Torah And Israel

05/14/2012 - 20:00
Special To The Jewish Week

Candlelighting, Readings:
Shabbat candles: 7:51 p.m.
Torah: Leviticus 25:1–27:34
Haftarah: Jeremiah 16:19-17:14
Havdalah: 8:58 p.m.                                                    

Rabbi Shlomo Riskin

Bob Dylan--and Ron Rosenbuam's--Problem with God

When the Ron Rosenbaum was researching his upcoming biography of Bob Dylan—to be published as part of Yale University Press’s Jewish Lives Series—he came across an obscure quote. In the mid-‘60s Dylan had written an experimental novel almost impossible to read. But being a diligent journalist, Rosenbaum muscled through the novel (“Tarantula”) and found a poem that included these lines: “hitler did not change / history. hitler WAS history.”

That was all he needed to stake a provocative new interpretation of Dylan. 

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