Food

Intermarrieds Cooking Up Trouble

A few years ago, when I wrote an article for The Wall Street Journal about increasing numbers of gentile moms raising Jewish kids, I was amused by the editor’s headline choice: “But Will The Chicken Soup Taste As Good?”

In fact, a sizable number of non-Jewish men and women who have married into the Tribe are taking on the responsibility of cooking the family’s chicken soup, along with other traditional Jewish dishes.

A Farm-To-Synagogue Shidduch

09/07/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

Like many setups, this one started with some Jewish mothers.

Brooke Saias, who was working for Hazon, the Jewish environmental organization, thought it would be a good idea to bring a CSA (community-supported agriculture project), to the synagogue community where she had been raised, Congregation Sons of Israel in Briarcliff Manor.

“When she came back this past winter, we talked to the rabbi, who was very interested,” said Sharon Saias. “He’s very interested in sustainability, and he championed this.”

Brooke Saias and Jonathan Kirschner: The greening of a Briarcliff Manor synagogue.

Kosher Couscous: Or, How Paris Got Its Jews Back

The publishing trend of telling history through food may be approaching its end. In any event, Mark Kurlansky pretty much has the genre cornered, telling history through oysters, cod and salt.

Kosher Waffles On Wheels

08/10/2010
Editorial Intern

If you’ve had enough of kosher Chinese food or shwarma, there’s a new option for lunch: waffles. 

A new food truck, Quick Stop Kosher, is traveling around Manhattan offering kosher-certified sandwiches, omelets, sushi, blintzes and waffles. This week the truck is parked on 33rd Street and Ninth Avenue, outside the Jewish-owned B&H Photo. 

Kosher to go: A new waffle truck joins the growing food truck trend.

Apps for Torah Study & Grace After Meals

As the Apple iPhone has become even more popular and an increasing number of Apple fans have picked up the iPad, there has been a wave of new applications created for these devices. Some are good and useful, while others... well, let's just say I'm not going to take the time to write a bad review.

Rabbi Eli Garfinkel, now calling himself "The App-ter Rebbe," has announced the publication of a new commentary on the Torah for Apple’s iOS devices: iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad.

Torah Commentary On the Go

There's a Kosher App for That

As someone who not only keeps kosher, but also works as a mashgiach (kosher supervisor), I often find myself away from the computer and searching for kosher food options. There are two good iPhone apps that help users locate the closest kosher options, whether it's a box of cereal or an Italian restaurant you're looking for .

RustyBrick's kosher app links to the largest kosher database on the web at the Shamash site. With over 2,000 restaurants in the database, the Jewish Kosher App for the iPhone or iPod Touch looks up the nearest kosher place to eat from your current location, using the iPhone's GPS features. (If GPS or localization isn't on or available, a location or name can be typed in.) Additionally, a kosher symbols database is available to quickly look up what kosher symbols are backed by which organizations or rabbi. As a bonus feature, all of the food blessings and prayers in Hebrew are included in this app so one can give proper thanks before and following the meal.

Another new iPhone app to help the kosher eater locate food is called My Grocery Master. It allows users to browse and search a database of over 100,000 Kosher, gluten-free and lactose-free items across the United States, meeting the user’s lifestyle and dietary requirements. Created by Nosh Maven LLC, My Grocery Master enables people following kosher diets to find acceptable food near their location.

 

New Apps Locate Kosher Fare

Power to the Pita

02/05/2010
Editorial Intern

The prospect of Greenwich Village’s best falafel enticed more than 120 hungry New Yorkers onto the cold streets late last month.

A “falafel crawl,” — which hit five kosher and non-kosher establishments in close proximity — was the latest adventure of NYC Food crawls, a group that began last October, with a dumpling crawl around Chinatown.

Mamoun’s Falafel on MacDougal Street received the most votes for taste and value on the Greenwich Village falafel crawl.

Kosher Food Going Natural

New Emphasis on low-fat, low-carb, organic fare sweeping through industry.

02/05/2010
Editorial Intern

Traditional Jewish food — six-inch-high, artery-clogging corned-beef sandwiches, cholesterol-high cholent with kishke and chicken soup
flavored with fatty schmaltz — isn’t quite in line with a healthy, balanced diet.
But with American’s growing obsession with healthy foods, and organic products — the organic industry grew from $1 billion in 1990 to over $23 billion today — kosher producers are offering more wholesome and beneficial products, and health food producers are gaining kosher certification.

Juices from Organic Avenue — like apple, carrot, cucumber and grapefruit — are an integral part of the raw food experience.

The Festival of Lite

12/04/2009
Editorial Intern

Chanukah foods don’t exactly bring healthy images to mind. In Israel, this time of year every bakery in town is serving up trays and trays of sufganiyot, doughnuts with your choice of jelly, caramel or even chocolate filling.
But as people worry about their waistlines and calorie counts, indulging in a fried delicacy for eight nights may not be the best idea.

This Chanukah, you can choose healthier baked doughnut “muffins,” left, or the full-fat fried version, above.

Tu b’Shevat Chef

01/16/2008
Staff Writer
Ilan Hall, best known as last year’s winner of Bravo TV’s highly rated show, “Top Chef,” was put to the ultimate challenge last weekend — prepare a breakfast dish using the seven species (grains and fruit) associated in the Torah with the Land of Israel.
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