Film

North Shore Gets A Film Festival

Inaugural Gold Coast fest plays to local demographic.

05/25/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

The obvious question is, “Does the New York area really need another film festival?”

The not-so-obvious answer, given by Regina Gil, the founder of the Gold Coast International Film Festival, which opens its inaugural event on June 1, is an emphatic affirmative.

“Infiltration,” top, and “Naomi” are two Israeli films that will screen at the first Gold Coast International Film Festival.

Von Trier And The Conscience Of Cannes

05/24/2011
Staff Writer

It often seems that we’ve become emotionally numb to talk about Nazis and Hitler. We toss around the word “Nazi” with such impunity these days that the essential meaning of who Hitler was and what the Nazis represent appears entirely lost.

Some worry that ignorance and latent anti-Semitism lurks behind our lax standards, but many suggest otherwise: it’s Holocaust fatigue, they say, a culture saturated not with too little knowledge about Nazis, but rather, too much.

Lars Von Trier

The Rabbi Was A ‘Freedom Rider’

N.J. spiritual leader, part of a new PBS documentary, looks back on his role in the civil rights struggle.

05/11/2011
Staff Writer

When Rabbi Israel S. Dresner got a call 50 years ago asking if he’d be willing to go on a Freedom Ride aimed at desegregating bus stations in the South, he did not hesitate.

“Remember, I’m a guy who grew up in the 1930s when Hitler was on the rise,” Rabbi Dresner, now 82, said in a recent interview from his home in Wayne, N.J. “How can I not be against racism?”

Rabbi Israel S. Dresner

Life-Saving Amid Bloodshed

Award-winning film about a Gaza boy and his Israeli doctor wins fans from all sides of the conflict.

05/10/2011
Staff Writer

In 2008, Shlomi Eldar, a prominent Israeli television journalist, was asked to do a segment on a baby Palestinian boy suffering from a lethal blood disease, and an Israeli doctor’s attempt to save him. But Eldar was reluctant.

Raida, right, with her 4-month-old son Mohammad, middle, in a scene from “Precious Life,” which airs on HBO this month.

New Names, New Genres

Second week of Israel Film Festival features slasher, nature and singles scene fare.

05/03/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

One of the pleasant side benefits of this year’s Israel Film Festival, now in its 25th year, is a profusion of unfamiliar names and even unfamiliar genres

.

Scene from “Land of Genesis,” top, and Keren Berger and Yaron Brovinsky in “2Night.”

Julian Schnabel On ‘Miral’ And The Conflict

04/07/2011
Staff Writer

For Julian Schnabel, the storm that followed the release of his new film, “Miral,” about a Palestinian woman who joins the first intifada, has not quite passed.

A week before the film debuted in late March, prominent Jewish groups criticized Schnabel, whose film was screened at the United Nations main hall. The American Jewish Committee, for instance, said that the film has “a clear political message, which portrays Israel in a highly negative light.”

Julian Schnabel with Freida Pinto during the making of "Miral."

Aaron Herman Interviews 'Peep World' Director Barry Blaustein

What happens to a rich, neurotic Jewish family when one of their own writes a tell-all exposing their dirty secrets? The Meyerwitz family is about to find out. And the timing couldn't be more hilariously awful.

The Aftermath Of Adolescence

Two ‘New Directors/New Films’ works, one French, the other Palestinian, focus on young adults.

03/24/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

No amount of thoughtful planning can trump the serendipity of chance. Consider this juxtaposition: Last week, two Jewish-related films opened in New York that dealt with children under pressure. This week, the 40th annual New Directors/New Films event opens and among the films programmed are two Jewish-related films about young adults dealing with the aftermath of adolescence.

Prudence (Lea Seydoux), a troubled teen in "Belle Èpine," part of the New Directors/New Film series.

Tim Boxer: The Lives and Loves of Elizabeth Taylor

03/24/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

Elizabeth Taylor, the legendary Hollywood icon who died Wednesday, March 23, in Los Angeles at age 79, was perhaps the most famous convert to Judaism since Ruth.

When she wed the flamboyant producer Mike Todd (born Avrom Goldbogen), she wanted to renounce her Christian Science and espouse his Judaic faith. He talked her out of converting, believing she wanted simply to please him.

Out of a total of seven spouses, Todd was the only one she did not divorce. He died in a 1958 plane crash and left a weeping widow.

Elizabeth Taylor and Israeli President Ephraim Katzir at a Variety Club dinner in 1976 at Tel Aviv Hilton. Photo by Tim Boxer

Actress Elizabeth Taylor Dies

03/23/2011

(JTA) -- Academy Award-winning actress Elizabeth Taylor, who maintained a support for Israel after converting to Judaism in the late 1950s, has died.

Taylor, known for her violet eyes and her plethora of husbands, died Wednesday of congestive heart failure at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where she had been hospitalized for about six weeks. She was 79.

Taylor converted to Judaism following the death of her third husband, Mike Todd, who was Jewish, in a plane crash and before marrying Jewish singer Eddie Fisher.

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