Democrats Making Their Pitch

Staff Writer and Washington Correspondent
With New York emerging as a key battleground in next week’s Super Tuesday presidential primaries, supporters of the top two Democratic contenders are stepping up Jewish outreach efforts here. Jewish advisers to John Kerry of Massachusetts, a 19-year veteran in the Senate, kicked off a focus group on Tuesday to work on polishing his image. At the same time, supporters of North Carolina Sen. John Edwards, who has been on the national political scene for five years and represents a state with a minuscule Jewish population, are working on raising his profile.

Good GOP, Bad GOP

Staff Writer
Turn on the TV in Brooklyn or Long Island and you’ll see former mayor Ed Koch praising Sen. Al D’Amato as “a real mensch.” Or you may see Holocaust survivor Estelle Sapir ask God to bless the Republican for helping her retrieve her father’s plundered fortune from Swiss bankers.

Lazio Sees Opportunity In Riverdale

Staff Writer
Republican Senate candidate Rick Lazio will seek to exploit the aftermath of a bitter Bronx primary battle when he campaigns in heavily Jewish Riverdale after the Sept. 12 election, The Jewish Week has learned. The visit is intended to take advantage of what one Lazio campaign insider called “resentment” against Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton, who has declined to take sides in the race pitting three-term incumbent Rep. Eliot Engel, who is Jewish, against African American challenger Larry Seabrook, a state senator.

Undecided On The Bima

Staff Writer
Interviews with a dozen New York-area rabbis Tuesday afternoon revealed that many were still undecided whom to vote for in the Democratic primary just hours before the polls closed. But there appeared to be a growing belief that many Orthodox and some Conservative Jewish Democrats would cross party lines in November to vote for Arizona Sen. John McCain, should he be the nominee, because of what they perceive as his strong, pro-Israel stance.

Prospects For Peace Brighten

Staff Writer
As two prominent Palestinian leaders announced plans to seek the presidency of the Palestinian Authority in elections Jan. 9 — one representing the younger generation and the other the “old guard” — Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon worked to keep his government in office while vowing to run for re-election should new elections be necessary next spring.

From Sharon To Shinui

Associate Editor

On election night Israel was no longer the 51st state, but it was New York that became an Israeli district all its own.
American Friends of Likud welcomed Ariel Sharonís re-election with balloons, campaign posters and a victory address from the prime minister, even if the party was on the East Side of Manhattan. Well into Tuesday night, several hundred American Likudniks heard from commentators and politicians long distance via phone and television hookups, as a steady stream of Likud leaders, from Sharon to Benjamin Netanyahu to Ehud Olmert said hello to New York.

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