One Year Later: It's All About Lucy

Just over a year ago I wrote on this blog about my daughter, Lucy, who was leaving our local Jewish community day school after first grade. I have been planning this “one year later” blog post for quite some time – and yet, when I go to put pen to paper, I don’t know where to begin.

So I’ll start with this: Lucy is doing great. She adjusted quickly and easily to public school. She is happy and confident and more than a few adults who know her have commented that “she is a different kid”. 

Meredith Polsky

Camps Build Robots And Ruach

Next cohort of boutique camps luring new generation of sophisticated Jewish teens.

Staff Writer

When Josh Steinharter was growing up in mid-’80s Dayton, Ohio, he split his summers between baseball camp and Jewish camp.

Six Points Sci-Tech Academy will allow teens to choose workshops ranging from robotics to environmental science. Courtesy of URJ

Israel Education: One Size Does Not Fit All

Special To The Jewish Week

On June 1, thousands of day school students in the New York area will march in the Israel Day parade.  While they will march by school, new research highlights differences among students within schools when it comes to caring about Israel.  The findings offer a call to action for day school leaders and supporters.

Cultivating A Secret Resource: Parents

Schools finding that the single most effective tactic for increasing enrollment is something only parents can deliver.

Staff Writer

When Rhonda Rose enrolled her twin toddlers at Beit Rabban Day School last year, she jumped in with both feet.

Before the school year even started, she was discussing ideas with the Upper West Side school’s marketing director, promoting the school on Facebook and writing articles about it for a day school parent website.

Rhonda Rose, left, at work in her twin sons’ pre-K class at Beit Rabban. Michael Daitikash/JW

NYU Calls For Probe Following ‘Fliergate’

Process of ‘restorative justice’ in wake of fake ‘eviction’ notices distributed by Palestinian students.


In response to the distribution of fake eviction notices at two NYU dorms last week, school officials have prescribed both an internal judicial investigation and a mandatory dialogue process known as “restorative justice.”

More than 2,000 students at Palladium woke up to find fake eviction notices. Miriam Lichtenberg/JW

Opinion: A Plea For Dialogue, Not More Stunts

Hillel director says a genuine effort at understanding needs to replace the downward spiral of name calling and social media warfare.

Skirball Executive Director, Bronfman Center for Jewish Student Life at NYU

Last Wednesday night, members of Students for Justice in Palestine at NYU (NYU SJP) slipped mock “eviction notices” under the doors of 2,000 Jewish and non-Jewish students in their residence halls — a violation of several of NYU residence hall policies — to protest Israeli “ethnic cleansing.” Some Jewish residents, upset by the intrusion and the content of the notice, assumed that they had been specifically targeted by the fliers and claimed that the act was anti-Semitic. To my mind, the content was highly inflammatory and I identify with their instinct to respond. They then called for judicial action towards NYU SJP, which the student group and some faculty then countered, impinged on SJP’s right to freedom of speech.

Rabbi Yehudah Sarna

East Ramapo Schools Fight

Orthodox social action group Uri L’Tzedek joins call for state oversight of haredi-controlled school district.

Staff Writer

An Orthodox social justice group has joined the call for state intervention in the East Ramapo school district, where the haredi-controlled board is accused of siphoning taxpayer money to private yeshivas. 

A 2011 protest against East Ramapo school board's deep budget cuts. Courtesy of The Power of Ten

Five Towns See Renewed Tensions Due To School Sale

Old divide between Orthodox-controlled school board, public school parents reopens; budget moves paint nuanced picture.

Staff Writer

A referendum on whether to sell a public school building in a Long Island town to a yeshiva is stirring up a decades-long conflict between the Orthodox families who send their children to private school and the non-Orthodox Jewish, black and Hispanic families who send their kids to public school.

For Preschool Teachers, An Israel Immersion

Lesson from Israeli classrooms, where the stress is on ‘interdependence.’

Staff Writer

When Alana Weinberg toured Israeli preschools recently with a group of early childhood educators, she was struck by how differently the classrooms were run.

First there was the student-teacher ratio — high, 12 to 15 kids for every instructor, compared to the 7- or 8-to-1 typical in the U.S.

Early childhood director Alana Weinberg explores a map of Israel with the 4-year-olds at Stein Yeshiva. Michael Datikash/JW

Lincoln Square To Host Shefa School

New West Side building will rent five classrooms to non-denominational program for kids with language-based disabilities.

Staff Writer

When Ilana Ruskay-Kidd decided start a Jewish day school for children with disabilities in 2012, she expected to be challenged by fundraising and finding teachers well versed in both Judaism and special education. What she didn’t expect was how hard it would be to find a location.

The newly built Lincoln Square Synagogue will house The Shefa School. Courtesy of The Shefa School
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