education

Finding Humor: The Strange, Wacky World Of Autism

There’s so much that has been written—and can be written—about the extraordinary, heartbreaking, gut-wrenching challenges of raising a child with autism. But I’m convinced that at least in our family, we get through the challenges—to the extent that we do—by leaning on our own version of lunacy, of laughter.

The author's son Noah. Courtesy of Nina Mogilnik

Parents As Partners In Disability Inclusion

Editor's Note: Thanks to Jewish Learning Venture for sharing this important blog post.
 

I’m watching my 14-year-old son with autism get on the van that takes him to a special school, a place where they have known him for 8 years. A place where they have watched him grow from a behaviorally challenged first grader to a budding high schooler eager to participate in the life of the community. I’m thinking about the value of being known, of being seen for your strengths and weaknesses. Especially when it comes to education, how important it is that they know how to help my son learn.

If you have ever entertained the thought of sending your child to religious school without letting the principal or teacher know that there are learning issues, let me ask you to think twice about that before doing it. And maybe a third time.

Rabbi Margot Stein and her family. Courtesy of Margot Stein

Satmar Decree Bars Women From Higher Education

08/24/2016 - 11:01

(JTA) — Hasidic rabbis from the Satmar sect reportedly have issued a decree barring women from pursuing higher education.

Haredi Orthodox men walking along the street in the Stamford Hill area of London, Jan. 17, 2015. (Rob Stothard/Getty Images)

Where Are Day Schools On Accelerated Kindergarten?

Educators tack to middle amid backlash, stress individualized learning.

06/01/2016 - 08:12
Deputy Managing Editor

At Solomon Schechter School of Manhattan, above, kids are taught to figure things out through collaboration.  Michael Datikash/JW
 

In January, a University of Virginia study came out confirming what parents and teachers had been noticing for years: that kindergarten today is more about reading and writing than about dress-up and pretend play.

Day Schools Should Emphasize Secular Education

05/24/2016 - 12:38
Special To The Jewish Week

Note: Following is an excerpt from remarks delivered at the Hannah Senesh Day School Gala in April.

What I’m about to say may seem provocative and critical of the day school world, and even your work, but I hope that you understand that my words come from Ahavat Yisrael [love of Jews].

Michael Steinhardt

Jane Tuv, 30

Subtitle: 

Teaching Without Borders

Teaching Without Borders

05/23/2016 (All day)

Jane Tuv, 30 - Teaching Without Borders

Nechama Price, 36

Subtitle: 

Revolutionizing Women’s Torah Learning

Revolutionizing Women’s Torah Learning

05/23/2016 (All day)

Nechama Price never learned Talmud until her post-high school gap year studying in Israel. Her all-girls high school simply didn’t offer it as an option.

“It was something that was so important to me, that I be able to learn on a serious level, because that’s how I felt a connection,” she said. “When I got the opportunity to learn Gemara, I felt it even more.”

Nechama Price, 36 - Revolutionizing Women’s Torah Learning

Jeff Kiderman, 29

Subtitle: 

Lowering Day School Tuition Costs

Lowering Day School Tuition Costs

05/23/2016 (All day)

Working as a consultant five years ago, Kiderman received an unexpected email from a philanthropist friend of his family who lives in New Rochelle.

Jeff Kiderman, 29 - Lowering Day School Tuition Costs

Naftuli Moster, 29

Subtitle: 

Advocating for Equitable Education

Advocating for Equitable Education

05/23/2016 (All day)

Growing up a Belzer chasid in Brooklyn’s Borough Park section, Moster thought of becoming a psychologist. With little secular knowledge, he didn’t know exactly what a psychologist does or how one is trained, but he was “interested in the human mind.”

Naftuli Moster, 29 - Advocating for Equitable Education
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