Clinton

For The Love Of Huma

07/22/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
In the course of his long political career, Anthony Weiner became accustomed to eager inquiries when he walked into a Jewish senior center without a wedding ring. 

“They all want me to meet their granddaughters,” the rail-thin, youthful politician told me as we walked into one such senior center on Brooklyn’s Ocean Avenue years ago. “And, they want to know what I’ve eaten today.”

Barak Dampens Embassy Furor

The legislative storm over the Clinton administration’s defiance of a law requiring that the U.S. embassy be moved from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem is intensifying. But there are also indications that lawmakers, responding to Prime Minister Ehud Barak&

08/25/2009
Washington Correspondent

Several pieces of legislation are in the hopper and letters criticizing the administration’s position are flying down Pennsylvania Avenue, but lawmakers who threatened to strip away the president’s authority to waive penalties under the original Jerusalem Embassy Act have apparently decided to hold their fire.

Meeting with Jewish members of Congress last week, Barak said a decision to force the embassy move now could have implications for the peace process he is trying to revive.

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Clinton Administration Running Out of Patience as Israel Votes

05/14/1999
Washington Correspondent

Administration officials are straining to keep up their public facade of impartiality as the election campaign in Israel heads toward a noisy conclusion. But just below the surface are mounting concerns about the impact of a victory by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on the promised U.S. effort to revive the Israeli-Palestinian talks — and a growing realization that even a victory by his chief opponent, Labor leader Ehud Barak, is no guarantee that a new U.S. initiative will advance quickly.

Peace Now Hits Hillary

03/01/2002
Staff Writer and Israel Correspondent
Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton’s whirlwind Israel visit, which scored points with citizens of the besieged Jewish state and New York constituents, has drawn criticism from an unlikely source. Americans for Peace Now, a group that closely supported the Oslo peace process championed by her husband, President Bill Clinton, rapped the senator and former first lady for not meeting with Palestinians.

Hillary Heading To Israel

02/15/2002
Staff Writer
As she plans to cap her first year in office with a trip to Israel, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton believes she’s vanquished a “stereotype” about her support for the Jewish state. “People who stood with me are glad they did,” Clinton told The Jewish Week in a telephone interview Tuesday. “A lot of people have come to me in the last year and told me they support me. It’s part of the process of standing on my own and being judged in reality, as opposed to some stereotype.”

Clinton Mess Seen As Boosting Jewish Vote

10/16/1998
Staff Writer
The only sure things in life are death, taxes — and a strong Jewish turnout on Election Day. And that will be particularly true this year, experts agree. Aside from the intense battle for the U.S. Senate here, a race which has the Jewish community torn between two favorites, there is another motivating factor: The Monica Lewinsky scandal. Polls show that with the exception of blacks, Jews are more supportive of President Bill Clinton than other ethnic groups.

Sex, Lies And Sermons

09/25/1998
Staff Writer
The sex scandal enveloping President Bill Clinton and the nation was a prime topic of discussion at Rosh HaShanah services this week, and many New York-area rabbis used their sermons to draw lessons from the tragedy.

The Three Amigos

10/02/1998
Editor and Publisher
The handsome, charismatic head of state has somehow maintained public support despite a series of incredible, seemingly fatal setbacks — from political scandals to being labeled a liar within his own party to well-publicized extra-marital affairs. He’s been counted out a dozen times in the last year alone, but he has survived and now even seems to be gaining ground. How does he manage to do it?It’s a question Benjamin Netanyahu and Bill Clinton could have asked of each other when they met at the White House this week.
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