civil rights

The Ruderman White Paper: On Police Violence, Media and Disability

Last week, the Ruderman Family Foundation (RFF) released its first “Ruderman White Paper”—a comprehensive, scholarly investigation of media coverage of disability in instances of police violence from 2013 to 2015. Its focus was to expose the lack of coverage on this important issue. New Normal editor Gabrielle Kaplan-Mayer spoke with Jay Ruderman, Foundation President, about why the Foundation is supporting this kind of study.

Police Violence. Courtesy of Stephen Melkisethian/Flickr

Near Site Of Landmark March, Philadelphia Museum Celebrates Jewish Role In Promoting Gay Rights

07/05/2015 - 20:00

Philadelphia — On July 4, 1965, 40 people gathered outside this city’s Independence Hall for the first Annual Reminder demonstration on behalf of civil rights for gays.

History Amid The Magnolias

04/13/2015 - 20:00
Travel Writer

The rain came down steadily, at times in torrents, other times in a chilly drizzle under leaden skies. But the legions of marchers on their way from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., to commemorate the recent 50th anniversary of that legendary civil rights march were undaunted by a little precipitation.

Maya Lin’s black-granite Civil Rights Memorial in Montgomery. Wikimedia Commons

Still More Bridges To Cross

Jews come to Selma ‘not to celebrate, but to be committed’ to justice.

03/10/2015 - 20:00
Staff Writer

Some rode all night on a charter bus from Greensboro, N.C. — eight hours through the heart of the Deep South to reach Selma. Some flew to Birmingham, and then made the two-hour bus ride to the aging synagogue a few blocks from the Edmund Pettus Bridge.

Thousands marched over the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma Saturday to commemorate Bloody Sunday a half-century ago.

People With Disabilities (And Their Families) Have Dreams, Too

When Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his inspiring “I have a Dream” speech in August, 1963 the civil rights movement for people of color had come of age.  I have listened to recordings of the speech too many times to count.  It inspires every time.  And it is emblazoned on our collective psyche. We all know the story of Rosa Parks, an African-American woman who refused, in 1955, to give up her seat on a public bus and move to the back so that a white person would be able to sit where she had been sitting.

Freedom Summer Memories

Black-Jewish alliance was brief, beautiful.

07/15/2014 - 20:00
Associate Editor

The naked light bulb was more harsh than bright. It was 3 a.m. on a sleepless, sweltering Florida night, June 19, 1964, in the St. Augustine jail. In a cell with two bunks were 17 Northern Jews, imprisoned for civil rights activities down South. Just 48 hours earlier they were relaxing at a convention for Reform rabbis in an Atlantic City hotel.

Martyrs of the movement: James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner. Wikimedia Commons

Studio JW: Why JFK Matters

An interview with author Scott D. Reich.

Heather Robinson speaks with attorney and author Scott D. Reich, a member of The Jewish Week's 2013 class of 36 Under 36, about his book "The Power of Citizenship: Why John F. Kennedy Matters To A New Generation."

Among the topics: JFK and the Jewish community.

Memory Marches On

An interracial group, including men and women from around the country, began gathering at a community college in Selma, Alabama, early on Sunday morning last week.

Civil rights marches -- and their subsequent re-enactments -- follow in old footsteps/Shalom Center

Celebrate Israel In Its Entirety

04/25/2012 - 20:00
Special To The Jewish Week Online

For me, like for most Israelis, the two weeks between the end of Passover and Yom Haatzma’ut, Israel’s Independence Day, are a time of year in which big concepts materialize in one’s daily life - our emergence as a people in the Exodus, the memory of the horrors of the Holocaust on Yom HaShoah, the remembrance, on Yom Hazikaron (Memorial Day), of the Fallen, through the celebration of the founding of the State of Israel.

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