Camp David

Egypt, democracy and Richard Cohen

 I've read a lot of ominous words about the chaos in Egypt and the anti-Mubarak demonstrations that now look like they will end the 30-year reign of this democrat-in-name-only. But nothing comes close in grimness to Richard Cohen's column in today's Washington Post.

Unrest in Egypt Could Lead to Israel’s Worst Nightmare

01/31/2011
JTA

JERUSALEM (JTA) -- For Israel, the popular uprising against the Mubarak regime raises the specter of its worst strategic nightmare: collapse of the peace treaty with Egypt, the cornerstone of its regional policy for the past three decades.

After Camp David Meltdown, Talks Resume, Expectations Low

09/29/2000
Washington Correspondent
Monday’s mini-summit between Prime Minister Ehud Barak and Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat in the Israeli leader’s home provided another lifesaving jolt to the gasping peace process. But in Washington, where high-level talks resumed this week between the parties and American negotiators, there was little optimism about a complete recovery.

The Arafat Squeeze Is On

The Clinton administration is stepping up its efforts to salvage something from last month’s Camp David meltdown and boost a battered Prime Minister Ehud Barak.

08/04/2000
Washington Correspondent
The Clinton administration is stepping up its efforts to salvage something from last month’s Camp David meltdown and boost a battered Prime Minister Ehud Barak. To help the Israeli leader, President Bill Clinton this week signaled that he will now consider moving the U.S. embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, a sharp reversal of policy that was also meant as a kind of shock therapy for Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat. Barak said Tuesday that the U.S. plans to “rent offices” in Jerusalem by Jan. 20, “and they will build an embassy.”

Leaders Here In Dark On Barak’s Endgame

07/14/2000
Washington Correspondent
Whether this week’s dramatic Camp David summit between Israel and the Palestinians succeeds or ends in rancorous failure, the results could be difficult for American Jews to swallow. But Jewish leaders here say Prime Minister Ehud Barak and his government have done little to prepare the community for the emotional jolts if Israel makes the expected deep concessions on bedrock issues such as Jerusalem and borders.
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