Bible

Exploring And Interpreting Disability In The Bible: Clearly And Comprehensively, Part II

In Part I of Exploring and Interpreting Disability in the Bible, a "wide-angle" perspective showed that the Bible does not often segregate the disabled. If biblical models encourage integration, why are many of us with disabilities still segregated?

Exploring And Interpreting Disability In The Bible: Clearly And Comprehensively

In recognition of the Shavuot holiday beginning on Saturday night, June 11, we have invited Rabbi Michael Levy to share his perspective on Torah and disability. This is the first of two parts. Rabbi Levy dedicates his writing to the marriage of Motti and Zahava Sturm.

A young Jewish boy prays at a synagogue in downtown Tehran. Getty Images

Bilaam’s Blessings And The Curse Within

06/29/2015 - 20:00
Special To The Jewish Week

The primary image of this parasha is of Bilaam — foremost sorcerer of the age, says Ramban — riding a talking donkey on his way to meet with King Balak of Moav. What does this episode mean?

Sandra E. Rapoport

The Book Of Ruth: A Celebration Of Female Friendship

05/27/2014 - 20:00

It’s hard to find a conversation in the Bible between two women. Sarah and Rebecca never speak to another woman in Genesis. Rachel and Leah speak with one another just once. Deena, Jacob’s daughter, never speaks at all. In the Book of Esther, Esther speaks often, and with power, but never to another woman. Against this background, the Book of Ruth stands out as a celebration of female friendship.

World's Second-Oldest Bible Fragment Digitized

The Nash Papyrus, found in Egypt, contains the Ten Commandments and part of the Shema.
12/22/2012 - 19:00

The University of Cambridge posted online thousands of pages from fragile religious manuscripts.

This Dead Sea Scrolls fragment is roughly contemporaneous with the Biblical texts Cambridge University digitized. Getty Images

Steven Millhauser’s Encounter with the Book of Samuel in The New Yorker

The December 10, 2012 issue of The New Yorker features a short story by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Steven Millhauser, “A Voice in the Night.”

The narrator of the short story in the Dec. 10 issue of the New Yorker is a conflicted secular Jew. Photo courtesy New Yorker

My God Problem

My 8-year-old daughter and I are having a little bit of a God problem lately.

It’s not that we’re unsure whether or not to believe in him; I’m satisfied with leaving it unresolved by being agnostic, and Ellie’s OK with that as well.
It’s not even the “why do bad things happen to good people” issue, because, while the world is outrageously unfair, I don’t think God, if he exists, is micro-managing the daily lives of the world’s almost seven billion people.

Athens and Jerusalem: The Case for Knowing the Classics

In our secular, liberal age, the Bible and the classics often get a bad rap.  The Bible represents everything modernity is not—free inquiry, divested of hoary beliefs—while the classics are often snidely dismissed as the hubristic fantasies of aging, if not already dead white males.

Dead Sea Scrolls: From Qumran Caves to Museums to the Web

After the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered in a cave in Qumran in the winter of 1946–47 by Muhammed edh-Dhib, a Bedouin boy, and his cousin, it still took two decades until they were placed on display in a museum.

The Dead Sea Scrolls are now online thanks to Google
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