Art

Art, Beauty and the Shoah

Yishai Jusidman’s color palette is limited to materials connected to the Nazi gas chambers:  Prussian Blue, a pigment that appeared on the chamber walls as a by-product of the Zyklon B Gas; a silicon dioxide power used for pellets that delivered the gas to the sealed chambers; and flesh-tone colored paints, referring to the murdered millions. 
 

Judaism and Comic-Con: Reality, or Sci-Fi Fantasy?

For those of you who are not fortunate enough to have a geek/nerd/fanperson in your life, New York Comic-Con was in town the weekend of October 11th to 14th. Stepping into the Javits Center is like magic, as you are suddenly surrounded by not only other people who have an over appreciation for comic books, but crowds so thick with people dressed as Princess Leia or Inuyasha that it’s hard to move.

New York Comic-Con, back in 2007 when it was way quieter.

Heather Stoltz, Making social justice part of her art.

05/22/2012

Heather Stoltz, 33

Twitter: @HeatherStoltz
http://sewingstories.com

The cause of social justice had been ingrained in Heather Stoltz for so long that her first job out of college — as an engineer designing bakery machines that replaced human labor — caused a crisis of conscience.

Heather Stoltz

Tel Aviv’s Push For Art Tourism

Israel’s cultural capital is putting artists front and center in 2012.

Israel Correspondent
05/15/2012

Tel Aviv — In the past few years, Tel Aviv has been dubbed a top travel destination for everyone from beach lovers to gays and lesbians, but until relatively recently few overseas tourists traveled to the city specifically to take in its contemporary art scene.

“The Tin Man” sculpture, part of Tel Aviv Art Year 2012.

Magnes Merger Has Its Costs

Partnership with UC-Berkeley seen mostly as a boon but questions linger about prized collection’s independence.

04/03/2012
Staff Writer

The new home of the Magnes Collection for Jewish Art and Life, a Bay Area institution renowned for its archives of material relating to Jews in the American West, displays all the museum’s ambition. 

The Magnes Collection, founded 50 years ago, has the largest collection of archives of Jews in the American West.

And the winner for Best Work of Zionist Art Goes to...

The culture wars in Israel these days makes you pine for the ones we had here, in the States, some 15 years ago.  In America, it all seemed like grand theater--Giuliani, for instance, catering to hard-core Christians aghast at a painting of the Virgin Mary covered in feces.  But in Israel the state has a far stronger hand in culture.  So when the current Likud Culture Minister, Limor Livnat, threatened to withhold money to artists who refused to perform in the Ariel performing center, in the occupied West Bank, it meant something.

Kosher Indian

Siona Benjamin’s ‘visual midrash’ explores her identity as a Bene Israel descendant.

05/31/2011
Staff Writer

When Siona Benjamin was in art school in the 1980s, her professors told her to avoid narrative painting, and to keep her work abstract.

Siona Benjamin and her work “Miriam,” Photos courtesy of Flomenhaft Gallery

FEGS Honors Pop Artist Jeff Koons

05/24/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

 Pop artist Jeff Koons is interested in the art of the grand gesture. But it is art on a very small scale that got him interested in FEGS, the Jewish communal organization that deals with employment, job training and counseling.

Koons became involved with FEGS through real estate developer and UJA-Federation of New York honorary board member Larry Silverstein and his wife Klara. He was invited to tour a downtown FEGS center in 2009, where he saw art being used to help people with various ailments.

Jeff Koons at FEGS.

Drawing The (Green) Line

MOMA’s Francis Alÿs retrospective omits the conceptual artist’s best works.

05/17/2011
Staff Writer

Four years ago, the Belgian artist Francis Alÿs displayed one of his best works in years, “The Green Line,” at Chelsea’s David Zwirner Gallery. With a characteristically axiomatic subtitle — “Sometimes Doing Something Poetic Can Become Political, and Sometimes Doing Something Political Can Become Poetic” — it gave an artist’s askance view of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and achieved that rare artistic feat: chastising the political status quo without becoming either cynical or simplistic.

An image from Alÿs’ “The Green Line,”  Courtesy of David Zwirner Gallery

Illuminating A Jewish Story

03/22/2011
Staff Writer

Here’s a dirty secret about Jewish journalism: a number of the stories we write aren’t really Jewish in nature. A story may be about a Jew, but other than that, there often isn’t much else of Jewish substance in many of the stories we print.

Editors hate it when you pitch a story whose sole qualification for being published is that your subject is Jewish. But the reality is that mainstream Jewish publications would not exist if we didn’t run these stories.

An illustration from Maira Kelman's show at The Jewish Museum
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