anti-Semitism

Three Wounded In Anti-Semitic Attack In Southeast France

06/05/2012

Three Jews wearing kippot were attacked on Saturday in the city of Villeurbanne, just outside Lyon in eastern France. Ten men armed with iron rods and hammers perpetrated what the French Interior Ministry has officially classified as an anti-Semitic attack.

Two of the three victims were hospitalized, one with injuries to the head, and the other with neck injuries.

The French police reported that the three victims, aged 19, 21 and 22, had been heading home when they were confronted by a gang of three, apparently Muslim, North Africans, Army Radio reported.

Stylist Vidal Sassoon Dies At 84

05/09/2012

Celebrity hairstylist Vidal Sassoon, who was committed to fighting anti-Semitism and fought in Israel's War of Independence, has died.

Sassoon died Wednesday in his Los Angeles home. He was 84. He had been battling leukemia, according to the Los Angeles Times.

In 1982, he established the Vidal Sassoon International Center for the Study of Anti-Semitism at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He toured the United States to raise funds for the center.

The Death of the Father: How Did Benzion Netanyahu Influence His Son?

How will the death of Benzion Netanyahu, the father of Israel’s prime minister who died in Jerusalem on Monday, at 102, affect his powerful son?  I don’t have a clue, though some, like Jeffrey Goldberg, have posited that it might—might—make the prime minister a little bit more willing to compromise with Israel's Arab neighbors.  Rather than play Nostr

Gertrude Stein: Why Her Fascist Politics Matter

Gertrude Stein’s collaboration with the fascist Vichy government was never a secret.  But, until now, many have simply ignored it; or, to use the critic Frederic Jameson’s phrase, given over to the “innocence of intellectuals.”  Stein’s avid support for Petain, the Nazi collaborator who headed the Vichy government, has often been written off as merely the tragic consequence of many a brilliant artists.  What mattered was her prose, not her politics.

Cantor's Candor On GOP 'Anti-Semitism'

Republican House Majority Leader Eric Cantor looked downright uncomfortable Wednesday when asked by Politico's Mike Allen at a breakfast forum about anti-Semitism in the GOP. 
The Virginian tries to take a pass on the question but then hands some credibility to it by talking about a "darker side." It seems he's talking about the darker side of politics in general, but he does not back down when asked the follow up: Is he referring to the GOP caucus?

Stories You May Have Missed

A defeated Illinois senatorial candidate this week blamed his last place finish on the fact that a local reporter outed him as an anti-Semite. A Mexican town celebrated Easter last Sunday with a “burning of the Jews” – Jewish effigies representing Judas Iscariot, the disciple who betrayed Jesus at the Last Supper, ultimately leading to his crucifixion.

CUNY Probing Anti-Semitism Charges At Brooklyn College

Jewish faculty among those defending provost against allegations of hiring bias.

04/10/2012
Jewish Week Correspondent

As officials at Brooklyn College grapple with charges that its provost has discriminated against Orthodox Jewish academics, more than three dozen faculty members — including several Orthodox Jews — have signed a letter defending the administrator.

Is Brooklyn College unfair to Jewish faculty?

Grassyards and Anti-Grassyards: Notes on The Gunter Grass Affair

In the war waging over Gunter Grass—the Nobel Prize winning German author, teenage Nazi soldier, and author of a poem denouncing Israel’s threats on Iran—it’s hard to tell whose national psyche is more scarred.  In Germany, where Grass, 84, published the poem, translated into English as “What Must Be Said,” the intellectual landscape has been virtual

On Adrienne Rich, R.I.P., and Radical Transformation

For the first half of her life, the woman born Adrienne Cecile Rich, in Baltimore, 1929, lived the life you would have expected.  She was baptized and raised in the Episcopalian church; her father was a medical professor at Johns Hopkins; her mother a pianist and composer.  Adrienne went to Radcliffe and wrote poetry.  By 1950, the kingmaker of mid-century poets, W.H. Auden, helped her publish her first collection, “A Change of World,” which featured accomplished if rather dull formal English verse—punctual meters, rhymes, etc.

On the Jewish Mount Rushmore, Would Ulysses S. Grant Make it?

Do you ever wonder what, one hundred years from now, historians will make of Obama’s record?  And how about something more specific: his record with Jews?  I do.  But reading Jenna Weissman Joselit’s review of a new book on Ulysses S.

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