aliyah

Nefesh B’Nefesh Cuts Staff, Salaries

02/04/2011

JERUSALEM (JTA) -- The aliyah organization Nefesh B'Nefesh says it has slashed18 percent of its staff and will cut the salaries of its remaining employees.

The organization last week made across-the-board cuts of 15 employees. Salary cuts were instituted at all levels as well, according to Yael Katsman, its marketing and communications director.

The cuts were first reported Thursday in Haaretz.

Services to olim will not be affected, Katsman stressed.

Federations Launch $5.5 Million Campaign for Ethiopian Aliyah

01/24/2011

NEW YORK (JTA) -- The Jewish Federations of North America is launching a $5.5 million fundraising campaign for Ethiopian immigration to Israel.

The campaign comes at the behest of the Israeli government, which agreed last November to bring up to 7,846 additional Ethiopians to Israel. Like Israel’s commitment, the federation’s campaign comes with an eye toward concluding mass Ethiopian aliyah; it’s called “Completing the Journey.”

Everybody’s Business

01/04/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

‘Watch out for my eye!” I gasp as my hair stylist, chatting up another stylist, waves his scissors dangerously close to my retina.

And to be fair, how else is he going to emphasize his words? To really underscore the significance and validity of his point?

I mean, is it his fault that my pesky ole eye had to up and get in the way?

“Ach, Don’t worry!” he consoles me. “We have another eye for you in back!”

Abigail Pickus

More Than 19,000 Immigrants to Israel in 2010

12/28/2010

JERUSALEM (JTA) -- More than 19,000 new immigrants arrived in Israel in 2010, a 16 percent rise over last year.

The Jewish Agency for Israel and the Ministry of Immigrant Absorption announced the increase in aliyah, the second year in a row following 10 years of declining numbers, in a statement released Tuesday.

Some 16,465 immigrants arrived in Israel in 2009 and 15,452 in 2008.

“Fumbles to fluency”

The Jewish Week caught up with Sharon two months into her aliyah journey. To read about her adventures fro the beginning, click here.

Ulpan courses — the Hebrew immersion regimen offered in (and now out of) Israel — are certainly as intense as they're advertised to be.

Following a year and a half of once a week prep at Ahuva Tal Hollander's New York-based Ha-Ulpan, I took a six-week intensive course at Hebrew University's Jerusalem ulpan this summer. Now, however, that I've officially immigrated here, I'm taking advantage of the five-month free ulpan to which I am entitled as a new citizen.

The beginning of the journey

Hi, I'm Sharon Udasin. After three years as a journalist for The Jewish Week in New York, I decided to take a risk and immigrate to Israel, something I had been thinking about pretty consistently for a couple years.

I had little interest in Israel and the Middle East until I graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in May 2007 and reluctantly had a taste of the “Birthright Kool-Aid,” so-to-speak.

A Jewish Imperative to live in the Diaspora?

10/15/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

Living in caravans in a small settlement town during my years learning in Israel, my dream was always to settle the land. As a religious Zionist, I feel that living in Israel is a tremendous and miraculous opportunity, and all Jews can and must consider making this life transition as we are all very familiar with the halakhic obligation of yishuv ha’aretz, the religious obligation to settle the Land of Israel. I would like to suggest, however, that in addition to this well-known imperative, there is also a crucial duty to reside in the Diaspora.

Rabbi Shmuly Yanklowitz

Six Decades on, American Olim—Some American Again—Reunite on Kibbutz

10/15/2010
JTA

KIBBUTZ GALON, Israel (JTA) – In 1952, a 20-year-old with bright blue eyes who had never seen much of life outside of the Bronx, N.Y., mounted a kibbutz tractor armed with a rifle to plow wheat and sorghum fields bordering the Gaza Strip.

Saul Adelson would live in Israel for eight years before returning to the United States for good.

Immigration to Israel Jumps in 5770

09/06/2010

JERUSALEM (JTA) -- Immigration to Israel rose by 18 percent in the Jewish year 5770, according to the Jewish Agency for Israel.

Figures released Monday by the agency showed that 17,880 immigrants arrived in Israel in 5770. Some 15,180 new immigrants had come to the Jewish state the previous year.

About 7,430 new immigrants in 5770 came from the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, a rise of 16 percent from the 6,340 of last year.

The decision to take the plunge.

Well, it’s official. I’ve finally decided to act upon the urge I’ve been resisting for the past two years — I’m going to move my journalism career to the Middle East, to Israel.

The decision was by no means a light one, as my friends, family and colleagues can all affirm. Luckily, I was able to get my bosses’ “blessing” because, quite honestly, leaving The Jewish Week was one of the hardest decisions I’ve had to make, as I’ve loved my job here.

Syndicate content