aliyah

“Fumbles to fluency”

The Jewish Week caught up with Sharon two months into her aliyah journey. To read about her adventures fro the beginning, click here.

Ulpan courses — the Hebrew immersion regimen offered in (and now out of) Israel — are certainly as intense as they're advertised to be.

Following a year and a half of once a week prep at Ahuva Tal Hollander's New York-based Ha-Ulpan, I took a six-week intensive course at Hebrew University's Jerusalem ulpan this summer. Now, however, that I've officially immigrated here, I'm taking advantage of the five-month free ulpan to which I am entitled as a new citizen.

The beginning of the journey

Hi, I'm Sharon Udasin. After three years as a journalist for The Jewish Week in New York, I decided to take a risk and immigrate to Israel, something I had been thinking about pretty consistently for a couple years.

I had little interest in Israel and the Middle East until I graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in May 2007 and reluctantly had a taste of the “Birthright Kool-Aid,” so-to-speak.

A Jewish Imperative to live in the Diaspora?

10/15/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

Living in caravans in a small settlement town during my years learning in Israel, my dream was always to settle the land. As a religious Zionist, I feel that living in Israel is a tremendous and miraculous opportunity, and all Jews can and must consider making this life transition as we are all very familiar with the halakhic obligation of yishuv ha’aretz, the religious obligation to settle the Land of Israel. I would like to suggest, however, that in addition to this well-known imperative, there is also a crucial duty to reside in the Diaspora.

Rabbi Shmuly Yanklowitz

Six Decades on, American Olim—Some American Again—Reunite on Kibbutz

10/15/2010
JTA

KIBBUTZ GALON, Israel (JTA) – In 1952, a 20-year-old with bright blue eyes who had never seen much of life outside of the Bronx, N.Y., mounted a kibbutz tractor armed with a rifle to plow wheat and sorghum fields bordering the Gaza Strip.

Saul Adelson would live in Israel for eight years before returning to the United States for good.

Immigration to Israel Jumps in 5770

09/06/2010

JERUSALEM (JTA) -- Immigration to Israel rose by 18 percent in the Jewish year 5770, according to the Jewish Agency for Israel.

Figures released Monday by the agency showed that 17,880 immigrants arrived in Israel in 5770. Some 15,180 new immigrants had come to the Jewish state the previous year.

About 7,430 new immigrants in 5770 came from the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, a rise of 16 percent from the 6,340 of last year.

The decision to take the plunge.

Well, it’s official. I’ve finally decided to act upon the urge I’ve been resisting for the past two years — I’m going to move my journalism career to the Middle East, to Israel.

The decision was by no means a light one, as my friends, family and colleagues can all affirm. Luckily, I was able to get my bosses’ “blessing” because, quite honestly, leaving The Jewish Week was one of the hardest decisions I’ve had to make, as I’ve loved my job here.

Campaign to Bring More Falash Mura to Israel Gains Steam

07/15/2010
JTA

NEW YORK (JTA) -- After months of fits and starts, advocates for Ethiopian aliyah are hoping that a visit to the African country this week by Israel’s minister of immigrant absorption will help set in motion a process that will bring some 7,500 additional Ethiopians to Israel.

So far, the Israeli government has committed to checking only 1,800 of them for aliyah eligibility and bringing those who qualify to Israel.

Career Paths Take A Detour To Israel

Three young New Yorkers with solid jobs make the leap to Jewish state.

07/14/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

 Note: In the third installment of “Aliyah Journal,” we report on three New Yorkers — one married couple and one single woman — who are leaving successful careers to start over in Israel.

 She worked in Mayor Bloomberg’s office. He was a New York City cop.

Their lives couldn’t be more “New York” — until the Serkins decided to fulfill their dream of making aliyah.

 Tracey Goldstein,  shut down her own event planning company to move to Israel.

In Israel, Older Olim Face Ageism Hurdles

Workplace bias is fact of life for over-40 immigrants in youth-dominated marketplace.

07/14/2010
Israel Correspondent

 Jerusalem — When Mike Diamond immigrated to Israel from South Africa a year and a half ago he didn’t expect a job to fall in his lap. But even though he was prepared for some rejection, Diamond was still shocked by the reception he received from recruiters and potential employers. 

“I spoke to a lot of people, to employment agencies,” Diamond, who held a high-level position in a pharmaceutical company back in Cape Town, said of his Israeli job search. 

Ex-New Yorker Devora Renert hopes the year she spent learning Hebrew will pay off with a job. Michele Chabin

Orthodox Who's Who Making Israel Home

07/02/2008
Editorial Intern

Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert may have declared the age of mass aliyah over, but aliyah from North America has ticked up in the last few years. And among those making the move this summer is a who’s who of Modern Orthodoxy.
Prominent rabbis and educators from the New York area, including Ari Berman, spiritual leader of The Jewish Center, a leading congregation on the Upper West Side, were feted last week by the Jewish Agency for Israel in its annual Olim Farewell ball.

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