AIPAC

Run Silent, Run Deep, Run German

Today’s Israeli Navy defends its nation’s shores in German-built U-Boats, and Germany’s Luftwaffe is flying Israeli-built aircraft. Now the word is the two countries are going to collaborate on developing smart missiles that could some day be used by the Saudi Air Force.

Goodbye, or 'those 24 years sure went by quickly'

Okay, my secret is out: I'm retiring after 24 years on this beat for the Jewish Week (please hold your applause and your decaying vegetables). It seems like the right time to reflect on the changes I've seen in the Jewish world and Jewish politics during that period.

Many of the activists I met way back in the day are still toiling in Washington, and some of the issues that preoccupied them more than two decades ago are still in play, while others are long forgotten. How many remember the Lautenberg Amendment? In 1987, it was on the lips of most Jewish leaders.

Bad As Israel’s Situation Is, It May Well Get Worse

06/07/2011
Editor And Publisher

You remember the “Jewish telegram?” It reads: “Start worrying. Details to follow.”

In other words, welcome to the new Middle East.

Gary Rosenblatt

A Proposal for Mideast Talks and Other Reflections on the Washington Week that Was

05/27/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

It's been a crazy week in the ongoing soap opera, "Bibi and 'Bama," and given the reception Prime Minister Netanyahu got in Congress, I think the GOP wishes Netanyahu could be their standard bearer in 2012. There are so many fascinating dynamics at work here that it would make for a top notch TV comedy if the situation weren't deathly serious.

First, let me make a modest proposal.

Who won the Netanyahu-Obama showdown? How about 'nobody?'

 People keep asking me: in a frenzied few days of speech making, lobbying and diplomacy in Washington, who came out on top – Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu or President Barack Obama? (see my story on the week's events here.)

’67 Borders Flap Deepens Rifts

Broad Jewish center being ‘bombarded’ in wake of Obama speech.

05/25/2011
Washington Correspondent

Washington — In the corridors of the Washington Convention Center, the buzz among more than 10,000 charged-up pro-Israel activists at this week’s American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) policy conference was all about new U.S.-Israel tensions in the wake of President Barack Obama’s call for Israel-Palestinian negotiations based on the 1967 borders — with land swaps — and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s angry response.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu left, President Barack Obama right.

Bibi Opts For Confrontation

Prime minister, at AIPAC, revives call against ‘indefensible’ borders.

05/25/2011
Editor And Publisher

Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu had an excellent response to President Barack Obama’s major speech on the Arab world and the Israel-Palestinian conflict. But it came two days too late, and the net result is another hasbara disaster for Jerusalem.

Gary Rosenblatt

An Insider's Look At AIPAC Conference: Just Me And 10,000 Other Attendees

Along with The Western Wall in Jerusalem and the ice sculptures at swanky Passover hotels' lunch buffets, the annual AIPAC conference in Washington surely must rank as one of the Seven Wonders of The Jewish World.

At AIPAC, Effort to Shift Focus Back to Agenda: Iran, Foreign Aid, Capitol Hill Relationships

05/24/2011
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- Let’s get past this U.S.-Israel relationship thing, so we can get on with important stuff, like the U.S.-Israel relationship.

That seemed to be the message this week at the annual policy conference of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee. With 10,000 people and both the U.S. and Israeli leaders in attendance – plus 67 U.S. senators and 286 members of the U.S. House of Representatives at the gala dinner on Monday night – this AIPAC parley was the biggest and in many ways the most impressive ever.

After Obama at AIPAC: do his critics have a plan? (And does the President?)

 Numerous Republicans have hit President Obama for his call for Israeli-Palestinian negotiations based on the 1967 borders with mutually agreed land swaps - an explicit way of stating what has been implicit in U.S. policy since Bill Clinton's administration.

Which leads to the question: exactly what are the critics for?

Do they support those in Israel and the small minority in the American Jewish community who say Israel has a right to the West Bank and Gaza and should not give them up, period?

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