ADL

ADL Urges Protest Organizers To Condemn Anti-Semitic Incidents

Agency has no evidence, though, that such comments represent the protest as a whole.
10/17/2011 - 20:00
Jewish Week Correspondent

Just as his organization once called on leaders of the Tea Party movement to condemn “manifestations of anti-Semitism and racism” at their rallies, says Anti-Defamation League National Director Abraham Foxman, it’s now urging “organizers, participants and supporters” of the Occupy Wall Street protests to take similar steps.

Is Kanye West a Philo-Semite?

The easy thing to do after Kanye West's poorly chosen words this weekend--in which he likened the noxious stares he gets these days to ones people might give Hitler--is to ask for an apology.  No word yet on whether any Jewish groups are asking for one, but my bet is that it's in the offing.  But perhaps a better thing to do is to ask: are his comments a reflection of philo-semitism?  

Notes on the Closing of Yale's Anti-Semitism Center

Last week, Yale made national headlines when it decided to close its five-year-old anti-Semitism institute. The decision came after a growing number of scholars began to question whether it was promoting anti-Arab sentiment, rather than coolly objective academic scholarship.  Not to toot my own horn, by I saw this one coming. 

’67 Borders Flap Deepens Rifts

Broad Jewish center being ‘bombarded’ in wake of Obama speech.
05/24/2011 - 20:00
Washington Correspondent

Washington — In the corridors of the Washington Convention Center, the buzz among more than 10,000 charged-up pro-Israel activists at this week’s American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) policy conference was all about new U.S.-Israel tensions in the wake of President Barack Obama’s call for Israel-Palestinian negotiations based on the 1967 borders — with land swaps — and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s angry response.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu left, President Barack Obama right.

AIPAC Likes Obama’s Clarification On ‘67 Lines

05/22/2011 - 20:00
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- The American Israel Public Affairs Committee said it "appreciated" President Obama's clarification that he did not expect Israel to return to its 1967 lines.

"In particular, we appreciate his statement that the U.S. does not expect Israel to withdraw to the boundaries that existed between Israel and Jordan in 1967 before the Six-Day War," the pro-Israel lobby said in a statement released after Obama delivered a speech Sunday to its annual policy conference.

Obama’s Speech: Groups Split Along Predictable Lines

05/19/2011 - 20:00
Staff Writer

President Barack Obama’s call for Israel to withdraw to its pre-1967 borders with “mutually agreed swaps” in order to create a Palestinian state in the West Bank and Gaza has split the American Jewish community along predictable lines: one right-wing group denounced Obama as the “most hostile president to Israel ever,” while centrist and left-wing groups commended him.

Obama's speech, AIPAC's problem

 President Barack Obama's “Cairo II” speech yesterday may have complicated life for the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC), whose annual policy conference he will keynote on Sunday.

In his speech at the State Department, Obama advocated an Israeli-Palestinian agreement with borders “based on the 1967 lines with mutually agreed swaps, so that secure and recognized borders are established for both states.”

Jewish Groups Plan Ads for Bibi Visit

05/18/2011 - 20:00

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- A number of Jewish groups are planning wide-reaching ads in time for Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's visit to Washington.

J Street is paying for a New York Times ad featuring an appeal by about 90 leading Israelis, including retired generals, noted scholars and prize laureates, calling on Israel to recognize Palestinian statehood and negotiate a deal with the Palestinians based on 1967 lines.

Obama Emboldened, But Old Middle East Obstacles Remain

Foreign policy victory in bin Laden killing may not lead to new peace initiatives.
05/02/2011 - 20:00
Washington Correspondent

The death of al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden at the hands of elite U.S. forces was a boost for a president with few foreign policy achievements to his credit. But it will do little to ease the foreign policy and political conundrums his administration faces in a changing Middle East, and in some cases may add new complications.

While the Palestinian Authority supported the U.S. action, Hamas quickly condemned the killing of a “holy warrior.”

Crowds gather in Times Square Sunday night as word spread that Osama bin Laden was killed by U.S. forces. photos Getty images

Must-read story on the sharia scare: Jewish law could be next

In the “must read” category, check out Ron Kampeas' story headlined “Anti-Sharia Laws Stir Concerns that Halachah Could Be Next.”

Ron looks at the still-growing movement in states across the country to ban sharia, or Islamic law, a movement that the ADL's Abe Foxman called "camouflaged bigotry.”

Proponents of such legislation play on absurd fears of an Islamic plan to take over the legal system of the United States.

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