recession

Slump in Charitable Giving Could Last Until 2022

 

The continued softness in charitable giving is hitting synagogues especially hard, and non-profits in general are facing a slog back toward recovery from recession that could take as long as a decade.

2011 donations were almost flat

A Tale of Two Cities: Jews vs. Hispanics and Blacks, New York City

New York magazine has a great chart comparing two adjacent New York City congressional districts in this week's issue.  One is District 14, which includes all of the Upper East Side, parts of Murray Hill, Long Island City, Astoria, and a few other less affluent places too.  The other is District 16, just north of the Upper East Side, and covers much of the South Bronx. The stats they line up are startling: the average income in District 14 is $79,385; in D-16 it's $23,073.

For The Jobless, A Place To Reconnect

A glimpse into the recession’s lingering impact in the Jewish community.

01/25/2011
Staff Writer

Ann Klein packed a tuna fish sandwich for lunch one recent morning, stepped in her car and headed south from her apartment in northern Westchester. A half-hour later, at 9 a.m., she parked outside a quiet White Plains office building near Westchester Airport, took the elevator one story up and sat down at a computer in a small cubicle.

But it wasn’t just another day at the office.

Until mid-afternoon the unemployed printing executive worked at the computer, and schmoozed with people in the row of adjacent cubicles and with the office staff.

Anita Greenwald, program coordinator at UJA-Federation’s Connect to Care office in Westchester.

Big Easy, Federations Struggling For Comeback

For a federation system hurting in tough times, New Orleans was a natural site for the GA.

11/10/2010
Editor And Publisher

 New Orleans — For a long time the 79th General Assembly of The Jewish Federations of North America had been scheduled to take place this week in Orlando, Fla. But after a top consultant scouted that city last winter, and concluded that it would add little to the spirit of the annual gathering of the federation movement — and that Disney World might prove a major distraction — the decision was made to move the three-day GA here to New Orleans.

Gary Rosenblatt

Lincoln Square Halts Construction On New Shul; Project Millions More Than Planned

10/15/2010

Anyone who has walked by the construction site of the new Lincoln Square Synagogue on Amsterdam Avenue lately has surely noticed that there’s not much construction going on. This week, the prestigious Modern Orthodox shul announced on its website that construction on the three-story, 50,000-square-foot- building has indeed halted.

Recession, cost overruns have halted construction on new Lincoln Square Synagogue on Amsterdam Ave.

Economic angst deepens; where are the Jews?

 I'm not sure there's anything more demoralizing than watching Congress and the Obama administration sputter away about an economy that seems to heading south once again.

The past few week's newspapers have overflowed with economic news, ranging from bad to really terrible; economic pundits like the New York Times' Paul Krugman tell a terrible story of economic ineptitude at every level and speak ominously about much worse to come.

A View From The Recession’s Frontlines

06/08/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

The calls come one after another. Eventually, they blur together — the 60-year-old unemployed real estate broker who is behind in his rent; the former headhunter who is struggling to find work; the wife of a recently laid off high-tech professional who can’t pay her family’s utility bills; and the 81-year-old man who needs an affordable place to live because his adult children can no longer subsidize his rent.

Do One Third Of Americans Blame Economy On Jews?

06/24/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
An online poll on anti-Semitic attitudes in the wake of the Bernard Madoff scandal suggests more than a third of Americans blame “the Jews” to some degree for the economic crisis. The poll, by two professors at Stanford University, did not distinguish between financiers, corporate CEOs, economists, government officials or others who are Jewish, but simply inquired “How much to blame were the Jews for the financial crisis?”

A Jewish Lifeline In the Economic Downturn

04/29/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
In a junior congregation room at the Young Israel of Woodmere, on Long Island, they are greeted warmly at the door and don blue nametags. Some linger by the refreshments; others schmooze in the center of the room. The bold make their own introductions, while the more reserved wait for the formal program to begin. It looks like a singles mixer, but the more than 100 people — men and women, young and middle-aged — are seeking matches of a different sort. They are job seekers, casualties of an economic downturn that has hit the Jewish communal world particularly hard.

Triple Threat

07/30/2008

Assistant Managing Editor
When an elderly immigrant client walked into the offices of the Council of Jewish Organizations of Flatbush this week, she was told the case worker who was to attend a city benefits hearing with her would not be able to do so. The worker has been laid off, one of seven employees at the agency affected by a 20 percent cut in city funding.
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