cellular telephone

Backlash To Helen Thomas Video Hits L.I. Rabbi

Rabbi David Nesenoff of Stony Brook targeted with anti-Semitic emails after veteran White House correspondent resigns under fire.

06/09/2010

No sooner was the video posted on YouTube of longtime White House correspondent Helen Thomas saying Jews should “get the hell out of Palestine” and “go home [to] Poland, Germany and America and everywhere else,” than anti-Semitic e-mails began descending on the Long Island rabbi who interviewed her.

Rabbi David Nesenoff: Shocked by outpouring of hate after he aired Helen Thomas video.

Jewish Songwriter Offers An Indie Take On Genesis

Wailing Wall’s Jesse Rifkin reimagines, and personalizes, the biblical story.

05/25/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Jesse Rifkin is remembering his childhood in Annapolis, Md. He began writing songs when he was 4. At that age, he loved the Beatles. He was already thinking of himself as a career musician.

“Sometimes you just know,” he says firmly.

It all came true; he has recorded an EP and two CDs with his Wailing Wall band, with the latter recordings being released through JDub Records. He will be launching his new album, “The Low Hanging Fruit,” with a gig in New York on June 4.

Songwriter Jesse Rifkin’s “Low-Hanging Fruit” CD bridges the Bible and the economic downturn.

Israel’s Radiation App

05/11/2010

These days, we’re warned that everything will give us cancer —diet soda, air pollutants and perhaps most prominently, cell phones.

But according to an Israeli high-tech startup, there’s an app for that. Or at least, there was, until Apple banned the product from its iPhone application store.

Apple has banned an Israeli cell phone application its creator says screens for radiation.

Unkosher Wheels, Friendly Faces

Williamsburg bike shop playfully flouts
the antipathy of some area residents to cyclists.

04/07/2010
Staff Writer

Jammed between industrial brick buildings on the cusp of chasidic South Williamsburg and hipster North is a white canopy that reads the words “Traif Bike” – in bold block letters that sandwich the silk-screened head of a chasid clad in side curls. Traif is Yiddish for non-kosher.

Beneath the canopy, passersby can visit a large black vending machine labeled “Bike Shop,” whose rotating carousel features $55 U-locks, $5 handlebar grips and $2 tire patch kits, among other life necessities like a $33 used BlackBerry.

Baruch Herzfeld, the self-proclaimed “new rebbe of Williamsburg.

Powering Down For Shabbat

03/18/2010

Listen carefully this weekend and you may hear the ring-tone sound of BlackBerries, cell phones and other devices being turned off.
 
It’s part of the launch of a National Day of Unplugging that takes place this Shabbat, the project of a group of hip young Jewish artists and creative types who want to revive the concept of the Sabbath as a day of rest, but on their own terms.
 
It’s about “powering down a little, but not turning off all the lights,” they say.
 

A cell phone sleeping bag.

Shabbat Unplugged

-This morning at the JCC, I was hurriedly checking my email on my phone when an elderly gentleman came up to me and asked what I do with that "thing" on Shabbos.

Young Ethiopians Fighting Back

12/19/2007
Israel Correspondent

Petach Tikvah, Israel — Recounting how officials in this central-Israel city stonewalled complaints this month about the segregation of four Ethiopian schoolgirls, Daniel Uoria paused to answer his cell phone. It was an adviser to the deputy mayor.

"It’s because the minister of education is coming here to see what happened," explained Uoria, 29, after the call as he sat in an office at the headquarters of the Kadima Party. "Once you make a stink, suddenly everybody wants to help."

Still Defiant In The Outposts

12/12/2007
Israel Correspondent

Ma’aleh Adumim, West Bank — Looking eastward to the Judean Desert’s moonscape, the hillside across the highway from this sprawling settlement looks more like a teen campground than a settler outpost.

Israel Rescues Lives, Image

08/14/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — On Friday afternoon, just a few hours after two horrific explosions rocked the American embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, First Sgt. Ilan Cryton received the call he had been expecting.

“I’d heard about the explosion on CNN but had to go out, so I kept my mobile phone open,” says the 25-year-old reservist, a member of the Israel Defense Force’s crack search-and-rescue team. “I had two hours to get ready, but luckily I live close to the base.”

Sing, Sing A (Yiddish) Song

10/18/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Imagine yourself onstage with a hard-rocking, all-star klezmer ensemble. You’re singing Yiddish classics with great voices like Adrienne Cooper, Basya Schechter and Debbie Friedman, and 500 people are cheering.

Sounds exhilarating, nu? Or maybe a little scary?

Would it help if the 500 people were singing along with you?

“Well, a conservative estimate would say that between 60 and 70 percent of the people were singing,” says Zalmen Mlotek.

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