AVI

Rabbi Files New Suit To Halt Belzec Project

07/25/2003
Staff Writer
Determined to stop construction of a "desecrating" sunken walkway through Poland's Belzec concentration camp, activist Rabbi Avi Weiss filed a lawsuit in state Supreme Court against the American Jewish Committee, this time naming himself as a co-plaintiff. But AJCommittee executive director David Harris labeled the lawsuit "frivolous" and defended the walkway, or "trench," as part of a necessary $4 million permanent memorial to the nearly half-million Jewish victims buried in mass graves at the death camp.

A Hebrew School Asks, What Dropouts?

05/01/2009
Staff Writer
Houston — In one second-floor classroom of Congregation Emanu El, a young Chabad rabbi is teaching a class on Jewish values. Down the hall, a newspaper editor from a Reform family is leading a civics discussion. In another classroom, a Reconstructionist rabbi and her students are talking about basic Jewish principles. More remarkable than the diversity of the teachers at the largest Reform religious school in Houston is the makeup of the students. All are high school-aged. All are in religious school because they want to be there.

Red Cross, Israeli Counterpart

11/22/2002
Staff Writer
The American Red Cross and Israel’s Magen David Adom signed an agreement Monday designed to strengthen relations between the two following a period of controversy. It spells out increased cooperation on several fronts, including preparedness for incidents involving weapons of mass destruction, international tracing and family reunification, and biomedical services. “It will take away the suspicions of the past between us,” said MDA director general Avi Zohar.

War Of Words Rages

09/27/2002
Staff Writer
Campus battles over the Middle East conflict and rising anti-Semitism are heating up on several fronts: # A national pro-Palestinian student conference declaring that “Zionism is racism” is slated for Oct. 12 at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, with plans to increase pressure on college officials to drop investments in Israel.

Shuls Of Straw: Yitz, Avi & The Big Bad Wolf

Friday, November 6th, 2009 It’s time to stop crediting “the Rav” (Soloveitchik) for having been the intellectual centerpiece of Modern Orthodoxy. He’s not. Never was. His “modern” Orthodoxy wasn’t all that modern, even in his prime. He was about as modern as your zaidy’s Eisenhower-era Dodge, equipped with only AM radio.

A Hebrew School Asks, What Dropouts?

04/29/2009
Staff Writer
Houston — In one second-floor classroom of Congregation Emanu El, a young Chabad rabbi is teaching a class on Jewish values. Down the hall, a newspaper editor from a Reform family is leading a civics discussion. In another classroom, a Reconstructionist rabbi and her students are talking about basic Jewish principles. More remarkable than the diversity of the teachers at the largest Reform religious school in Houston is the makeup of the students. All are high school-aged. All are in religious school because they want to be there.

The Idealism, And Realism, Of King Hussein

11/19/2008
Staff Writer
During the reign of King Hussein, Jordanian currency would be printed with an empty space next to the image of a prominent site or prominent citizen. Hold the dinar up to a light, and a faint picture of the king would appear.

Abduction As A Weapon

06/30/2006
Staff Writer
As far back as the Munich Olympics of 1972, Palestinian terrorists and their supporters have used kidnapping as a political tool, abducting Israeli civilians and soldiers to be used in potential prisoner swaps and to obtain other concessions from Israel. Following is a chronology of prominent Israeli kidnappings and MIA cases: 1972: Members of the Black September terrorist group sneak into the Olympic Village in Munich and take 11 members of the Israeli delegation hostage. All 11 are killed.

Back To Bucharest

04/13/2007
Staff Writer
Like most members of his generation, who grew up in communist Eastern Europe during the last years of communism, Sorin Rosen had no Jewish education or upbringing. “Nothing at all,” he says. Like many Jews from former Iron Curtain countries who belatedly discovered their Jewish roots, Rosen became interested as a teen in learning what he had not as a child. After visiting some distant relatives in Israel, he became active in several Jewish organizations in Bucharest, his Romanian hometown. Like some, he drifted toward religious observance.
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