Adam

A Vision for Street Torah

03/22/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

This column is a protest: its intent is to help prevent Jewish thought from being hijacked to the monastic serenity of quiet mountaintops where peace is chosen over truth and the self over the collective. Authentic religion today is lived in the hustle and bustle of the streets and it is here that Torah can be most transformative for 21st century Jews. As Moses is reassured (Deuteronomy 30:12), “Lo bishamayim hi” – The Torah is not in the heavens!
 

Specter Of Dinkins Injected Into Mayoral Race

At 11th hour, safe streets now an issue, thanks to Giuliani; will it help or hurt Bloomberg?

10/21/2009
Assistant Managing Editor

Rudolph Giuliani’s much-maligned comments at a Jewish breakfast Sunday, implying the city might fall into anarchy under Democrat William Thompson, have placed Mayor Michael Bloomberg in a bind.
The aura of continuing his predecessor’s tough-on-crime policies is vitally important to the incumbent’s re-election effort. Yet Bloomberg has struggled not to be seen as polarizing and divisive, the way much of the city views Giuliani’s eight-year tenure.

Race in the race? Giuliani’s comments before a Jewish audience in Borough Park Sunday were seen by some as fear-mongering

On The Right Track

02/17/2006
Staff Writer
Turin, Italy This time Adam Rosen heard from the American coaches.

‘If You Stream It, They Will Come’

09/18/2009
Staff Writer
Lisa Gilbert, a native of Cincinnati who now lives in Manhattan, listened to the rabbi’s sermon and the choir’s singing at her family’s Cincinnati congregation on the High Holy Days last year. From her New York apartment. Online. Gilbert, a 30-year-old research analyst, watched the live streaming Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur services of Congregation Beth Adam, on the humanistic synagogue’s Web site, because she had attended several congregations after moving here and did not feel welcome or comfortable at any one of them.

Holocaust Humor Losing Its Shtick

09/25/2009
Staff Writer
Hitler, suffering from laryngitis, mounts a podium in Berlin at the end of World War II to deliver a stirring oration. Out of sight from the masses, a Jewish thespian intones the words that the lip-synching dictator apparently is shouting. A concentration camp survivor, who had survived his internment by acting as a dog for a sadistic commandant, encounters a Jewish boy who fancies himself to be a dog in a psychiatric hospital after the war. The older survivor adopts canine behavior to bring the boy back to reality.

Begging For Forgiveness

09/22/2006
Staff Writer
A man who likes extinct languages, Mel Gibson had a chance to practice his Latin this summer — he made several mea culpas.   Following his drunken, sexist, profane, anti-Semitic tirade in Malibu in July, the actor-director apologized to the police officers who arrested him. He apologized in a general public statement for saying “despicable” things. He apologized “specifically to everyone in the Jewish community,” to “those who have been hurt and offended by those words.”  

Alumni Venture Funds Catching On

10/16/2009
by Tamar Snyder Staff Writer It wasn’t just about the money. That’s what Idit Klein says about the initial $1,000 grant she received from the Bronfman Youth Fellowships’ Alumni Venture Fund in 2004. Klein, the executive director of Keshet, a nonprofit that champions the inclusion of LGBTs within the Jewish community, used the small seed grant to mount an educational campaign centered on marriage equality.

A Voice For The Macs

02/15/2002
Staff Writer
Adam Cohen had two dreams as a kid in Great Neck: to play shortstop for the Mets and to become a sportscaster. The Mets haven’t called yet. “I don’t think that is going to happen,” he says. But his second dream has come true. Cohen, 22, has teamed with Avi Bloom, 21, to broadcast the Yeshiva University men’s basketball team home games this season over the Internet. Their broadcasts on the school’s Web site (www.yu.edu) replace the ones that were carried for several years on the now-defunct student radio station.

Can A Jewish Democrat Still Get Elected In This Town?

10/08/2009
Assistant Managing Editor

For decades they were a fixture on New York’s political landscape: names like Ed Koch and Abe Beame, Andrew Stein and Alan Hevesi, Harrison Goldin, Mark Green and Elizabeth Holtzman.

Now that landscape is shifting, leaving behind the question: Can a Jewish Democrat get elected in this town anymore?

Mark Green and David Yassky
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