Mediterranean

Ladies (And Gentleman) Of Spain

06/20/2003
Staff Writer
With a bare midriff and gyrating hips, Sarah Aroeste performs jazz and rock blended into favorites from her Sephardic repertoire: songs like "Hija Mia" (The One I Want) and "Yo M'enamori" (Moon Trick).

After 500 Years, A Return To Judaism

Miquel Seguara, a ‘Chueta’ descendant of Mallorcan Jews forced to convert, reclaims his heritage.

12/24/2009
Special To The Jewish Week

More than five centuries after his ancestors were forced to convert to Catholicism, and more than 300 years after a relative was burned at the stake for secretly practicing Judaism, Miquel Segura of Mallorca, Spain, returned to the Jewish people.

Pride And Prejudice

06/13/2008
Staff Writer
Each year for the last decade Tel Aviv’s Gay Pride Parade has marched through the streets of the Mediterranean-side city. Last week, for the first time, it began at a new municipal center for Israel’s homosexual community.

Split Infinitives

11/09/2001
Staff Writer
Pity poor Zeno, tormented by his weakness for cigarettes, guilt about his mistress and unresolved tensions with his father. At his psychoanalyst’s suggestion, Zeno writes his memoirs, but the result is the imperfect recollection of an intelligent man blindsided by swirling desires and frozen by inhibitions. Zeno, the prematurely aged protagonist of Italian Jewish writer Italo Svevo’s comic masterpiece “Confessions of Zeno,” deeply resonated with William Kentridge when he first read the book in college.

More Free-Speech Furor In N.J.

07/25/2003
Staff Writer
When New Jersey Gov. James McGreevey didn't like what state Poet Laureate Amiri Baraka had to say about Israelis in a poem about 9-11, he took action. McGreevey, with the nearly unanimous support of the state Legislature, abolished the state-funded post through budget cuts several weeks ago to get rid of Baraka. In recent weeks McGreevey has said he didn't like the "abhorrent" views of a Rutgers University pro-Palestinian student group that is sponsoring a national conference in October at the state-financed institution.

In Gibson's Defense

04/11/2003
Staff Writer
A Jesuit priest working with Mel Gibson on his controversial film about the last hours of Jesus' life says Jews need not worry about being portrayed as Christ-killers. Father William J. Fulco, a professor of ancient Mediterranean studies at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, says he is "intimately familiar" with the script of Gibson's upcoming, self-financed movie "The Passion" and there is "no hint" of the deicide charge that Jews were responsible for the crucifixion of Jesus.

This Fellah Works For Arafat

05/01/1998
Staff Writer
When Palestinian Authority President Yasir Arafat sought an economic adviser for the proposed first joint industrial project with Israel, he turned to a 63-year-old Libyan Jewish businessman who has broken bread with Col. Moammar Khadafy. And the businessman, Rafello Fellah, is betting his reputation and a small fortune that the proposed Karni Industrial Free Trade Zone on the border of Israel and Gaza will help foster a new era of peace between the two entities.

A Voice For The Homeless Of Gush Katif

05/15/2009
Staff Writer
Like many of the 8,000 Israelis who were evacuated by the Israeli Army from Gaza in August, 2005, Dror Vanunu who lived in Gush Katif and served as a spokesman for the evacuees, is now based in temporary quarters, a pre-fabricated home in Nitzan, near the Mediterranean coast between Ashdod and Ashkelon. He was in New York recently as part of a lobbying and public relations mission.

Aid For IDF’s ‘Lone Soldiers’

08/12/2009
Staff Writer
Givat Olga, Israel — On a recent steamy Mediterranean day, a few hundred young Israeli soldiers, outfitted in their khaki dress uniforms, sat down for dinner in an air-conditioned hall at a small military rest-and-recreation center here. While some spoke in Hebrew, many held their conversations in English or Russian or Spanish, the languages of their homelands.

A Voice For The Homeless Of Gush Katif

05/13/2009
Staff Writer
Like many of the 8,000 Israelis who were evacuated by the Israeli Army from Gaza in August, 2005, Dror Vanunu who lived in Gush Katif and served as a spokesman for the evacuees, is now based in temporary quarters, a pre-fabricated home in Nitzan, near the Mediterranean coast between Ashdod and Ashkelon. He was in New York recently as part of a lobbying and public relations mission.
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