East Coast

A Critique Of Rabbi Eric Yoffie

 Ed Case of InterfaithFamily.com has an interesting perspective on the legacy of the Union for Reform Judaism’s

Missed Signals, And How

06/01/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

‘How was your tour of the Old City?” I asked my friend who traveled all the way from Chicago to visit me.

“Oh, Abigail,” she said, her eyes gleaming, “I met the most wonderful guy. His name is Phil.”

Texas Gov. Perry: Gulf oil spill could be 'act of God.'

 Can you believe this guy?

According to Politico, Texas Gov. Rick Perry, a Republican, is now arguing that the Gulf of Mexico oil spill may have been an “act of God.”

Can Palin Win Over Jews?

Could Obama’s growing problems with the community translate into popularity
for our least-favorite Sarah? Despite a new website, most experts say no.

04/27/2010
Staff Writer

If you believe the conventional wisdom about the 2008 presidential election, Democratic candidate Sen. Barack Obama was having a very tough time garnering Jewish support before Sen. John McCain picked a running mate. Polls in the Jewish community had Obama getting about 55 percent of the Jewish vote, as much as 20 percentage points lower than John Kerry or Al Gore, the two previous Democratic presidential candidates.

Sarah Palin.

Drill, Baby, Drill: The (barely audible) Jewish response

The Reform movement, which really wants to like President Barack Obama even while some other Jewish segments bash him because of the diplomatic chill with Israel, isn't exactly happy with his newly announced energy policies, which some environmentalists say could turn East Coast beaches into a gooey mess and actually forestall genuine energy independence.

Downtown: A Tale Of Redemption

01/02/2008
Managing Editor

In a high-lonesome twang right out of the piney woods of the Ozarks, rock and roll Americanist Levon Helm sings of “a sorrow in the wind / blowin’ down the road I’ve been / I can hear it cry while shadows steal the sun.” Helm was the soulful, Arkansas-raised drummer in the pioneering ‘60s roots rock group The Band, and the song is an old gospel tune “Wide River to Cross” on his new CD, “Dirt Farmer.” It’s a prayer, really, a poignant hymn to loss but also a declaration that life rambles on, that “I’m only halfway home,

Downtown: A Tale Of Redemption

01/02/2008
Managing Editor

In a high-lonesome twang right out of the piney woods of the Ozarks, rock and roll Americanist Levon Helm sings of “a sorrow in the wind / blowin’ down the road I’ve been / I can hear it cry while shadows steal the sun.” Helm was the soulful, Arkansas-raised drummer in the pioneering ‘60s roots rock group The Band, and the song is an old gospel tune “Wide River to Cross” on his new CD, “Dirt Farmer.” It’s a prayer, really, a poignant hymn to loss but also a declaration that life rambles on, that “I’m only halfway home,

Tu b’Shvat And A Planet In Peril

01/26/2010

It’s become almost a cliché: every year progressive Jewish groups use the festival of Tu b’Shvat, which falls on Saturdy, to make the point that Jewish law and tradition demand concern about our endangered planet. And then it’s business as usual until next year, when the festival prompts another outpouring of concern.

What Will We Talk About? The Conventions and the State of American Politics

09/05/2008
Special to the Jewish Week

Let’s see… the Olympics are over.  The political conventions are over.  Other than what sounds like endless hurricanes making their way towards the east coast, we’ve run out of the big topics!

Well, not quite.  The conventions may be over, but now comes two solid months of unending bombardment with commercials, debates, op-eds, blogs (can’t complain too much there, I guess), and what Seinfeld would undoubtedly refer to as just so much yadda.  It’s time to hunker down.

Rebuilding Community In The West

JTA
12/08/2009
Scottsdale, Ariz. — Jean and Arnold Palestine are glad to be back home — an attached condo unit overlooking the craggy red mountains of the Arizona desert. Having just returned from a winter visit to Florida, the octogenarian New Yorkers are pleased that they chose to retire to the arid Western desert in 1992 rather than move down south.
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