Tikkun

Home of Tikkun’s Rabbi Lerner Vandalized

05/04/2010

(JTA) —  The northern California home of Rabbi Michael Lerner, editor of the progressive Tikkun magazine, was vandalized Sunday night. Posters attached to his door and the fence around his Berkeley home attack Lerner personally, and liberals and progressives, as being supporters of terrorism and “Islamofascism,” according to the magazine.

Tikkun to honor Goldstone

04/26/2010
JTA

NEW YORK (JTA) – Tikkun magazine will give its 25th annual ethics award next year to Richard Goldstone, author of the U.N. report on the Gaza war.

The announcement of the award came amid the controversy over Goldstone’s attendance of his grandson’s bar mitzvah in South Africa. Goldstone initially said he would skip the family simcha to avoid planned protests at the event by Zionist groups in South Africa, but late last week an agreement was reached to allow Goldstone to attend the bar mitzvah without protest.

The Fixer

05/24/2002
Staff Writer
Nathan Englander's first book, "For the Relief of Unbearable Urges," caused considerable buzz when it was released in 1999. Tall and slender, with a mane of dark curls and soft features befitting a biblical hero, the 30-something author became the darling of the Jewish book-fair circuit, drawing swarms of potential book buyers in Jewish Community Centers and synagogues nationwide.  

Petitioning For Campus Peace

10/11/2002
Staff Writer
With tensions mounting on American campuses over anti-Semitism and the Israel-Palestinian conflict, hundreds of college presidents have signed onto a landmark petition calling for "intimidation-free" campuses. But the document itself has become the subject of controversy. That's because the statement, released by the American Jewish Committee, specifically mentions only intimidation against Jewish students. As a result, some university presidents have declined to sign.

Sculpting A New Salt Lake City

02/22/2002
Staff Writer
Visitors to Salt Lake City during the Winter Games have seen the first signs of the city’s effort to change its public face — tree-lined mediums on major streets, a light rail system, more parks. And some visitors have met the man behind the changes — Stephen Goldsmith, Salt Lake City director of planning and fourth-generation Salt Lake City Jew.
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