New York Times

Doctorow’s Postmodern Jazz

03/03/2000
Jewish Week Book Critic

The one thing that most reviewers of E.L Doctorow’s new novel City of God (Random House) seem to agree on is that it’s an ambitious work. It’s an unusual, non-linear, non-smooth, rambling postmodern novel that takes on themes of God, science, religion, love, war, popular music, bird watching and movies; it’s also a novel about writing. Not always easy to follow, its several narrative lines and multiple speakers shift abruptly, and those readers who like their novels to have beginnings, middles and ends might find it difficult.

Giving Small, Making A Big Difference

12/07/2007
Special to The Jewish Week

The newspaper story gnawed at him.

How is it possible, Robert Ivker thought, that in a city as affluent as New York, Holocaust survivors from the former Soviet Union can live in such grinding poverty? This despite efforts by agencies like the Jewish Community House of Bensonhurst (JCH) to provide hot meals, transportation to doctors, and free English-language instruction.

The Story That Won’t Go Away

02/06/2009
Special to the Jewish Week

Yesterday’s New York Times probably had more of substance about the Shoah on its front page than all the issues combined from the years of 1939-1945.

The NYT reports on anti-gay laws in Uganda

A disturbing article in today's New York Times reports on the impact of U.S. evangelicals, who have brought their anti-homosexual message to Uganda and at least indirectly contributed to the ongoing legislative push to make being gay a crime on a par with murder. The Times reports that the American evangelists “are finding themselves on the defensive, saying they had no intention of helping stoke the kind of anger that could lead to what came next: a bill to impose a death sentence for homosexual behavior.”

The NYT reports on anti-gay laws in Uganda

Monday, January 4th, 2010 A disturbing article in today’s New York Times reports on the impact of U.S. evangelicals, who have brought their anti-homosexual message to Uganda and at least indirectly contributed to the ongoing legislative push to make being gay a crime on a par with murder.

The Age Of ‘Slamming’

10/24/2002
Staff Writer
Last Sunday’s New York Times declared that Jewish life on the Lower East Side was in its death throes. Meanwhile, a gathering at the historic Eldridge Street Synagogue proved that, at least in some corners, the neighborhood’s Jewish activity was not yet gone, just showing its age. A group of about a dozen poets aged 65 and older, and an audience twice their number, had gathered in the 115-year-old sanctuary that mellow morning for the Eldridge Street Project’s second annual Poetry Slam for Seniors.

Family Feud, Kabul Style

In every age and throughout every attempt to annihilate the Jewish people, what the Prophet Isaiah called the “saving remnant” has kept Judaism alive. Now comes Seth Rozin’s new comedy at the New Jersey Rep,

12/09/2009
Special to the Jewish Week

In every age and throughout every attempt to annihilate the Jewish people, what the Prophet Isaiah called the “saving remnant” has kept Judaism alive. Now comes Seth Rozin’s new comedy at the New Jersey Rep, “Two Jews Walk Into a War...,” in which the two last Jews in Afghanistan, members of a community that was almost destroyed during the Soviet invasion and the subsequent rise of the Taliban, need to work through mutual animosity to preserve the Jewish heritage.

Inside The Satmar School Scandal

04/23/1999
Staff Writer
Peering out at the reporters and TV cameras clamoring around the entrance of his religious girls school in Brooklyn last week, Rabbi Hertz Frankel's mind raced as they demanded he comment on his crime. It was a serious crime, a federal felony involving no-show teachers, fund diversions, false job titles and clear breaches of the separation of church and state. It was one Frankel had quietly pleaded guilty to the previous week.

The Orthodox Candidate

08/14/1998
Staff Writer
Like the candidate, the audience was Orthodox and likely to be staunch in its defense of Israel. So Noach Dear lost no time in making his pitch explicit. “We have how many shomer Shabbos politicians?” he asked the Sunday morning bagels-and-cream-cheese crowd gathered to hear him at the Young Israel of Far Rockaway last month, using the term for Sabbath observers. Touting his campaign to represent them in Congress, Dear urged, “This is a way to contribute to the community.”
Syndicate content