Natural History

Mifgash In Mount Kisco

Northern Westchester teens participate
in exchange program with Israeli peers.

04/13/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

The gym at the Rosenthal JCC of Northern Westchester in Pleasantville echoed with the steady buzz of more than 100 middle school students, occupied in equal measure with eating vast quantities of kosher Chinese food, texting and chatting.

Westchester pre-teens and their Israeli peers pose for a shot during Shoham Global Connections program.

Star Gazers

11/22/2002
Special to The Jewish Week

Vitaly Komar, clad in all black, huffed up the stairs of the Center for Jewish History with a reporter in tow. “I like this place,” said the one half of an internationally known Russian artist team. “It’s like a club house, not white and antiseptic like most museums that can feel like a hospital.”

Einstein’s Jewish Equation

11/22/2002

Albert Einstein’s combination of scientific genius, humility, good humor and distinctive grooming made him a cultural icon. An illuminating exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History provides remarkably lucid explanations of the shock-headed scientist’s theories that changed the way light, time, energy and gravity are understood.

“Einstein” also demonstrates how the Nobel Prize-winning physicist used his celebrity to promote his other passionate concerns: pacifism, socialism, disarmament and Zionism.

Einstein’s Jewish Equation

11/22/2002
Staff Writer
Albert Einstein’s combination of scientific genius, humility, good humor and distinctive grooming made him a cultural icon. An illuminating exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History provides remarkably lucid explanations of the shock-headed scientist’s theories that changed the way light, time, energy and gravity are understood. “Einstein” also demonstrates how the Nobel Prize-winning physicist used his celebrity to promote his other passionate concerns: pacifism, socialism, disarmament and Zionism.

Star Gazers

11/22/2002
Special to The Jewish Week
Vitaly Komar, clad in all black, huffed up the stairs of the Center for Jewish History with a reporter in tow. “I like this place,” said the one half of an internationally known Russian artist team. “It’s like a club house, not white and antiseptic like most museums that can feel like a hospital.”
Syndicate content