the Jewish Week

No Texting During The Haftorah!

Welcome to etiquette boot camp for the bar/bat mitzvah set.

Special to the Jewish Week
05/26/2010

Send in your RSVP on time. Don’t show up at the bar mitzvah party in sneakers. And no text messaging during the bar mitzvah boy’s speech.

Has Miss Manners gone Jewish? Maybe not but a growing number of yeshiva day schools are arming their students with such etiquette tips before they take their spin on the bar/bat mitzvah circuit.

Halacha and Innovation Are Not Mutually Exclusive

The case for the evolution of gender roles in Jewish life.

05/04/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

This past week, Rav Hershel Schachter, eminent Torah scholar and leading figure at Yeshiva University, issued fighting words. The ordination of women as rabbis is such a serious infraction of Jewish Law, he insisted, that it technically falls under the rubric of “Yehareg Ve-al Ya’avor”—one should sooner be killed than violate the Law.

Animal Cruelty and Jewish Law

05/03/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

Q: This may sound weird, but I think my neighbor is cruel to his pet beagle. I know that if this was a person we were talking about, Jewish law would obligate me to go to the authorities. But this is a DOG. What's my obligation here?

A. You need to pursue this. I say this not merely because I am life-long pet-o-phile, a vegetarian with two cuddly standard poodles. I say this also because it is the right thing to do. Jewish culture has long championed animal rights.

Rabbi Joshua Hammerman

How Moshe met Einav

05/03/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

Moshe Tabashi plays wheelchair basketball and wheelchair tennis. Though he couldn’t get down on his knee to propose to Einav Levi, he found a dramatic way to pop the question.

“Moshe is a problem solver,” says Einav. “When the paralysis in his legs couldn’t be reversed, he found a way to cope. And beyond coping – he lives life to its fullest.”

Moshe Tabashi and Einav Levi

On Jerusalem Day, Don’t Write Out Jews On The Left

04/30/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

May 12 (Iyar 28) will mark 43 years since the Israeli army’s triumphal entry into the Old City of Jerusalem. This is certainly a moment for the Jewish People to celebrate the restoration of Judaism’s holiest sites to our people.

Seeing Beyond the Immediate in the Synagogue

04/30/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

Of the many things that I admire my wife for, one (surely not the most significant) is her ability to walk into an empty room in a house and imagine how it might or ought to look with furniture and everything else that makes up a room. The couch can go there, the rocker there, that painting over there… it’s this remarkable ability to see beyond what presents right now and have an image of what it might be.

Rabbi Gerald Skolnik

Witnessing Haiti: A Call for Transparency in Disaster Relief

04/29/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

We all watched in dismay when Haiti was struck with a devastating 7.0 earthquake; the consequences of this natural disaster intensified by Haiti's status as the 2nd poorest nation in the Western hemisphere. One hundred days later, hundreds of thousands are living in tents in refugee camps without sanitation as the devastation and fear continues with little signs of progress.

Tevel B’Tzedek Israeli volunteer therapist

Law Day and the US Senate

04/27/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

May 1 was proclaimed Law Day in 1958 by President Eisenhower, in an explicit effort to pre-empt the celebration of May Day as an international worker's holiday - one that honored the struggle for the eight-hour day begun in the US. But the celebration of the rule of law and observance of the struggle for workers' rights are not necessarily at odds. After all, it is through the democratic enactment of laws that our rights are made real. In our system, those laws are judged to be in accord with the protections of our Constitution - or not - by impartial courts.

What a Bunch of Flaming Idiots Taught Me About Values

04/29/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

When I received an email from the New Victory Theater announcing a family comedy show called "The Flaming Idiots", my trigger finger clicked to buy four tickets faster than I could stop it. Little did I know that, in between the crackerjack juggling and zany shenanigans, I would experience a dramatic illumination of my personal values.

Life coach Deborah Grayson Riegel

Slow Cooked Through the Ages

The story of cholent goes to the heart of Jewish history and tradition.

Special to the Jewish Week
04/28/2010

The origins of cholent, the thick, slow-cooked savory Shabbat stew, the traditional Sabbath midday meal, go all the way back to the time of the Talmud. Indeed, its history takes it on a route so dispersed across centuries and cultures throughout the diaspora, that in different countries it’s alternatively known as hamin (Aramaic for warm, Hebrew for hot); or dafina or adafina (Arabic for “covered”). There are even variants in its Yiddish name, whether schalet in the Yiddish of Germany or shulet in the Yiddish of Eastern Europe.

PHOTO: American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee. Baking challah for Shabbat at the Immouzer camp.
Syndicate content