Pennsylvania

Facing Up To The Hurt

05/19/2000
Staff Writer
Regina Benshimon was busy preparing for Yom Kippur last September, but she stopped as the sun set the evening before the Day of Atonement would begin to celebrate the Sabbath. After dinner with her husband and the five of her seven children who lived at home (the two eldest were already married) she went to bed early. It was to be the 44-year-old chasidic woman's last Shabbat.

Nevison: I Did Nothing Wrong

06/16/2006
Staff Writer
After pleading guilty this week to five counts of sexually abusing his young nephew over a four-year period, Cantor Howard Nevison continues to maintain that he did nothing wrong. In an exclusive interview with The Jewish Week Tuesday (the first time he has spoken publicly about the case that made sensational headlines in 2002) Cantor Nevison said that his deal with prosecutors was akin to a "no contest" plea: "when you don't admit to anything."

Nevison Defense, Prosecution Spar

04/05/2002
Staff Writer
Even before Cantor Howard Nevison’s trial begins, the defense and the prosecution are clashing over the case’s timing. Nevison, who is employed by Temple Emanu-El in Manhattan, was arrested last month on charges that he sexually abused his young nephew, the son of the clergyman’s brother. Another Nevison brother was found guilty of abusing the same boy and is serving time in a Pennsylvania state prison. That man’s son, a cousin of the victim, pleaded guilty on similar charges and is now out on parole.

Evolution Of The Feminist Seder

04/14/2000
Staff Writer
In Richardson, Texas, they call it “Miriam’s seder.” “Hers Seder” is the term of art in Pennsylvania, at the American Jewish Congress gatherings. And in a diverse cross-section of neighborhoods, towns and cities, from the semi-suburbia of Hollis Hills, Queens, to the flatlands of Canton, Ohio, to the East Bay of San Francisco, to the deep South of Birmingham, Ala., the event is known simply as a women’s seder.

Batting 1.000 For Shabbat

08/30/2002
Staff Writer
Do you know what time Shabbat ended in Williamsport, Pa., last week? You did if you were watching ESPN. The cable sports channel was broadcasting a semifinal game in the Little League World Series, and 12-year-old Micah Golshirazian was sitting in the dugout of the Jesse Burkett All-Stars (New England champions from Worcester, Mass.) and as a Sabbath-observant player, he wouldn't play until Shabbat was over. At 8:43 p.m. A clock on ESPN counted down the minutes. In the dugout, Micah watched a scoreboard clock.

Gold Medal For Conscience

02/03/2006
Staff Writer
Lake Placid, N.Y. If the United States has a winter sports capital, it is this hilly village 40 miles from the Canadian border and site of two Winter Olympics. And if this capital has its 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., it is 218 Main St., across from the shore of Mirror Lake, where the Olympic Center skating rink is located, where the "Miracle on Ice" gold medal victory of the U.S. men's hockey team in the 1980 Games took place, where the Winter Olympics Museum Lake Placid displays the community's proud photographs and artifacts from 1932 and '80.

Breaking Ranks With Reform Movement

09/01/2006
Staff Writer
Adrian Shanker, a college student from Westchester, spent this summer working as an intern in Washington. During his time in the capital, he took part in a training program run by the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism. The other young participants in the RAC program shared Shanker’s support for Israel. And, like him, many of them, opposed Israel’s month-long war in Lebanon this summer. A war — spurred by Hezbollah attacks on Israel and kidnappings of Israeli soldiers — that the leadership of the Reform movement supported.

Crashing The Kosher Party

10/29/2004
Staff Writer
If you were walking the blue-carpeted aisles of the Javits Convention Center this week, sampling the items at the 16th Kosherfest food and food service trade show, you noticed some familiar names. Empire. Osem. Gold’s. Jackie Mason — as in Jackie Mason’s Cheesecake. And you also saw some relatively new names, like Lilly, Carol Ann, Rosie, Aunt Gussie and Steve’s Mom — women’s names.

Creator Of ‘Mini-Israel’

10/29/2004
Staff Writer
Shlomo Shulsinger, a Jerusalem native who came to the United States with his family as a teenager and became a pioneer in the Hebrew-speaking summer camping field, died Oct. 19 in his hometown after a long illness. He was 92 and was buried on the Mount of Olives. Mr. Shulsinger — who was known to his campers simply as Shlomo — founded Camp Massad in Far Rockaway, Queens, and developed the day camp into three overnight camps in the Poconos. The camps closed in 1981. Mr. Shulsinger retired in 1977, returning with his wife, Rivka, to Jerusalem.
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