New York

A Jazz Man’s Roots Music

10/22/2004
Managing Editor

Of the elite jazz musicians working in New York, pianist Bruce Barth is probably the only one who can claim a klezmer pedigree.

Barth, 46, who has emerged as one of his generation’s most compelling pianists and will share the stage Monday at Merkin Hall with the legendary Cedar Walton in a two-piano duet, developed an ear for klezmer in high school in Harrison, N.Y. It was then that his brother introduced him to a clique of New York bluegrass musicians, including mandolinist/clarinetist Andy Statman and banjoist Tony Trischka.

A Jazz Man’s Roots Music

10/22/2004
Managing Editor

Of the elite jazz musicians working in New York, pianist Bruce Barth is probably the only one who can claim a klezmer pedigree.

Barth, 46, who has emerged as one of his generation’s most compelling pianists and will share the stage Monday at Merkin Hall with the legendary Cedar Walton in a two-piano duet, developed an ear for klezmer in high school in Harrison, N.Y. It was then that his brother introduced him to a clique of New York bluegrass musicians, including mandolinist/clarinetist Andy Statman and banjoist Tony Trischka.

A Classroom For Principals

08/24/2000
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem - While their students savored every minute of summer vacation, an international group of senior educators spent part of their holiday break in an Israeli classroom. A varied mix of Hebrew day school professionals attended the Principal's Seminar on Jewish Education in the Diaspora at Bar Ilan University's Lookstein Center, which ran from July 10-24. Held partially on campus, partially in Jerusalem, the seminar afforded principals the ordinarily rare opportunity to share ideas with their peers, learn new strategies and assess their schools' strengths and weaknesses.

Godsend: How Josh met Amanda

02/24/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

 

Josh met his bride-to-be in 10th grade when he left the private Hebrew Academy in Great Neck, New York and moved to the town's North High. "At first I thought he was a pest," says Amanda. '"I found him to be annoying."

By 11th grade, they had become friends, and Josh Wein realized he had a crush on Amanda Levine.  It was obvious to everyone. Even their English teacher said to him, "Why don't you ask her out already?"

Amanda: "I found him to be annoying."

Being Real

01/05/2001
Staff Writer

Growing up was never easy for copper-skinned Rebecca Walker, the trophy baby of a new America. Born in 1969, the “Movement Child” of Pulitzer Prize-winning writer and activist Alice Walker and civil rights lawyer Mel Leventhal, Walker spent the first two decades of her life failing to fit into a country that still assumes fixed racial categories.

Klezmer City

09/27/2002
Staff Writer

Constanza Garcia was looking to book New York performances for “Klezmer en Buenos Aires” — a tango-inflected klezmer duo that she promotes. She immediately thought of Makor, the cultural center on the Upper West Side that caters to Jews in their 20s and 30s.

“I thought Makor would be the right place for klezmer,” Garcia says. But Makor passed.

Mukasey And Straight Answers

11/09/2007

 Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) is right to support the confirmation of Judge Michael Mukasey as attorney general. And he’s right that the nomination presents lawmakers with an “extremely difficult” decision because of Mukasey’s refusal to take positions on the critical issue of coercive interrogation techniques used in the war on terrorism.

The Man With A Hundred Faces

11/20/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

He has been a rabble-rousing Roman poet and a choreographer struggling with a recalcitrant young ballerina, a doctor battling encroaching age and hospital bureaucracy and a Nazi saboteur hanging from the Statue of Liberty by his fingernails. If you know who he is, you are a serious student of film history. If not, then you may ask – as the title of the new documentary opening on Nov. 23 bluntly puts it — “Who Is Norman Lloyd?”

Touro College Founder Succumbs At 94

Indefatigable Dr. Bernard Lander grew school
well beyond its New York roots.

02/11/2010
Staff Writer

Rabbi Dr. Bernard Lander, the visionary founder and president of Touro College, which he grew from 35 students to a global network of 29 schools educating 17,500 students in New York, California, Nevada, Florida, Israel, Russia, Germany and France, died Monday of congestive heart failure at a New York hospital. He was 94.

Up until his last days, Bernard Lander continued to put in a full day of work at Touro’s 23rd Street headquarters.

New Push For Reform Immigration To Israel

07/13/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Rabbi Andrew Davids, executive director of the Association of Reform Zionists of America, makes no secret of the challenges his group faces as it tries to increase aliyah, or immigration to Israel, within the Reform movement.

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