New Jersey

A Hyundai Day School?

04/14/2009
Staff Writer
A no-frills day school is the third proposal by parents in New Jersey’s Bergen County this year to offer intensive but affordable Jewish education. The initiative, outlined last week at an “exploratory meeting” in Englewood, would establish a day school with an annual tuition below $10,000, larger class size than at most day schools, and fewer costly expenditures like extracurricular activities and state-of-the-art technology.

Crayons And Buttons:The New ‘Paper Clips’ ...

04/14/2009
Staff Writer
It’s the second generation of “Paper Clips.” A decade after the project conducted by middle school students in rural Tennessee to collect six million paper clips — in memory of the Jewish victims of the Holocaust — caught the public’s attention and became the subject of a 2004 documentary, several Jewish institutions are conducting their own collection drives. This time, it’s crayons and buttons. This time, it’s for the 1.5 million Jewish children who perished in the Shoah.

Day School Alternative Explored In Englewood

02/11/2009
Staff Writer
A group of Jewish parents in Bergen County whose application to establish a Hebrew-language charter school was recently turned down by the New Jersey School Board has started discussions with its local Board of Education for a Hebrew-language track in a public school.

Keyboard Kaddish

01/28/2009
Staff Writer
Kaddish became a daily tradition for Mark Leinkram, a publisher-printer from Clifton, N.J., after his sister Sharon died of cancer last year. Not from an observant family, he faithfully recited the Aramaic mourner’s prayer, but didn’t understand all the meaning behind it. Now he’s starting to learn. Leinkram, 50, is one of the first to turn to mykaddish.com, an on-line resource guide established last week by Partners in Torah, an educational outreach organization affiliated with Torah Umesorah, and by the incubator Afikim Foundation.

Interfaith Leader Klenicki Dies

01/28/2009
Staff Writer
Rabbi Leon Klenicki, one of the Jewish community’s leading voices for rapprochement with the Catholic Church, died Jan. 25. A resident of Monroe Township, N.J., he was 78. Rabbi Klenicki, a native of Argentina, served as the Anti-Defamation League’s director of Interfaith Affairs until his retirement eight years ago, and as the ADL’s co-liaison with the Vatican, meeting frequently with Church leaders in Rome, the United States and other countries.

Israeli (Cyber) Hoop Dreams

11/12/2008
Staff Writer
Steven Minns, a basketball fan in New Jersey, says he had trouble following the exploits of his favorite player, Davon Jefferson, a former star at the University of Southern California now playing professional ball in Israel this season. Then Minns discovered the just-launched Web site, israelifantasyhoops.com.

Newman’s Own Image-Changing Role

09/29/2008
Staff Writer
‘Exodus” was not an easy sell in 1960. When director Otto Preminger decided to adapt Leon Uris’ best-selling novel about the founding of Israel into a feature-length film, he ran into heavy resistance in Hollywood’s major studios. Too Jewish, too controversial, they said. Then Paul Newman signed on.

In The Bat Mitzvah Spirit

06/17/2005
Staff Writer
Among the concerns for the Lippmans of the Upper East Side in planning their daughter Juliet's bat mitzvah last fall was how to give the occasion some spiritual significance. "What should we do so it's not just a party?" Marie Lippman asked a friend, Rabbi Adina Lewittes of Tenafly, N.J., over lunch at a Midtown restaurant a few months before the bat mitzvah. Rabbi Lewittes answered by telling a story she had just read in Rabbi Daniel Gordis' on-line column from Israel.

In The Bat Mitzvah Spirit

06/17/2005
Staff Writer
Among the concerns for the Lippmans of the Upper East Side in planning their daughter Juliet's bat mitzvah last fall was how to give the occasion some spiritual significance. "What should we do so it's not just a party?" Marie Lippman asked a friend, Rabbi Adina Lewittes of Tenafly, N.J., over lunch at a Midtown restaurant a few months before the bat mitzvah. Rabbi Lewittes answered by telling a story she had just read in Rabbi Daniel Gordis' on-line column from Israel.

Southern Comfort

06/07/2002
Staff Writer
Rabbi Rafael Grossman, for nearly three decades the spiritual leader of the largest Orthodox congregation in the United States, left his Southern synagogue recently for a small, struggling synagogue here because of one five-year-old boy. His grandson. Rabbi Grossman, visiting his son's home in Teaneck, N.J., last year, heard his grandson say, "I think I know who you are." The rabbi was stunned. Bi-monthly visits to his children in the areas of Boston and New York would no longer be enough. The grandchildren had to know bubbe and zaide.
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