Florida

Good News for McCain — or Polling Mush?

Wednesday, July 9th, 2008 James Besser in Washington Here’s a political shocker for you: Jews who say religion is “an important part of my daily life” are more likely to vote for Sen. John McCain, the presumptive Republican nominee, than those who say religion isn’t as important. How do you spell “Duh?” This nugget was part of a Gallup poll released this week that shows the same dynamic working in the broader population, but even more so.

Obama/Bloomberg 08?

Tuesday, June 24th, 2008 Adam Dickter Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s spirited defense of Barack Obama before a Jewish organization in Florida this week leads to the obvious questions about whether he’s positioning for a veep nomination, trying to stay politically relevant, simply speaking his conscience, or some combination of the above.

AIPAC Conference Will Welcome Politically Troubled Olmert, Clinton

Friday, May 30th, 2008 AIPAC’s ability to lure top politicians to its annual policy conference is widely accepted as a measure of the group’s undiminished clout. By that standard, this week’s conference of the pro-Israel lobby giant — which begins today - suggests that the federal prosecution of two former employees and continuing attacks from the Walt-Mearsheimer axis were mere blips, not major crises.

Lieberman Sticks with Preacher McCain Rejected

Thursday, May 29th, 2008 This week’s Jewish Week asked whether Sen. Joe Lieberman, a Connecticut independent and top John McCain supporter, would keep his promise to speak at pastor John Hagee’s Christian Zionist summit in July, now that the minister’s endorsement has been rejected by McCain. It didn’t take long to get an answer: on Wednesday, Lieberman said he had no plans to reverse his decision. Here’s his statement in full:

Why is Obama So Worried About the Jews?

Thursday, May 15th, 2008 Why is Sen. Barack Obama devoting so much time and energy trying to win over Jewish voters? On the surface, the numbers don’t add up. A majority of Jews are going to vote Democratic in November’s presidential contest no matter what; does the difference between 61 percent (what Obama scored in a recent Gallup Poll and 74 percent (what John Kerry actually won in 2004) really make that much of a difference?
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