Daf

Mixed Record On Return Of Property

05/02/2008
Staff Writer
Lublin, Poland — On the first two nights of Passover, the ground floor of a former medical academy near Lublin’s historic Old City was crowded by early evening with members of the Jewish community. Children played for hours in the hallways while senior citizens schmoozed in a small office. After sundown, joined by other members of the community and a Jewish choir from Warsaw, they filed into a social hall for the seders; afterward, they stayed to play and shmooze some more.

Homecoming At Last

03/31/2000
Staff Writer
During 31 years at Columbia University, Rabbi Charles Sheer has seen a succession of political movements wax and wane: anti-war at the beginning, then feminist issues, and gay rights in recent years. But the rabbi's most poignant memories at the university are about small classes, not sweeping events. Since becoming the school's Jewish chaplain in 1969, two years after he was ordained by Yeshiva University, Rabbi Sheer has taught classes every semester, usually in Chumash (Torah) or Gemara (Talmud).

Mixed Record On Return Of Property

04/30/2008
Staff Writer
Lublin, Poland — On the first two nights of Passover, the ground floor of a former medical academy near Lublin’s historic Old City was crowded by early evening with members of the Jewish community. Children played for hours in the hallways while senior citizens schmoozed in a small office. After sundown, joined by other members of the community and a Jewish choir from Warsaw, they filed into a social hall for the seders; afterward, they stayed to play and shmooze some more.

Still Out In The Cold

02/08/2002
Staff Writer
Yossi Goldberg played soccer and basketball as a boy growing up in Israel, but figure skating was in his blood — his mother was a figure skater in Lithuania. That, says Goldberg, founder and president of the Israeli Figure Skating Association, is why he has devoted a dozen years to a winter sport in a Mediterranean country.

On The Same Page

02/25/2005
Staff Writer
Several dozen times over the past seven years, the Levine family of Greenwich Village has invited a few friends to a private celebration in a kosher restaurant. Each meal was a siyum, marking the completion of a tractate of Talmud studied by Danny Levine and his two teenage sons. “Usually about eight or nine” people came, Levine said. Tuesday will be the Levine family’s final siyum, but a restaurant couldn’t hold everyone coming.
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