worker

How Adam met Melissa

04/02/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

Horseradish was more important than romance. That was the hard truth for Melissa Gold, who had a fellow very interested in her but she had to attend to business. He wanted to go out. She had to think of Passover and the Seder table.

Melissa was a graduate of Syracuse University (business studies) and a fifth generation worker in the family firm: Gold Pure Food Company. Her father is the president of the kosher condiment firm in Hempstead, New York. Millions of jars of Gold horseradish had to be ready for the holiday. She hoped that Adam would wait.

Adam and Melissa

The Edge of Town: Uncanny Tales of Survival

Thursday, February 26th, 2009     (Because of a formatting error on the main site, here’s a corrected version of this week’s “Edge of Town” column).       Uncanny Tales Of Survival   “Small Miracles of the Holocaust,” and the mysteries of coincidence          by Jonathan Mark      

Moving On To The Next Tragedy

Staff Writer
09/22/2009
Eight years after the Twin Towers crumbled over downtown Manhattan, rescue worker Charlie Giles still wakes up regularly with nightmares of the North Tower collapsing on top of him, enveloping his body his flames and in suffocating debris. One night recently, he even woke up to find himself throwing things. “I said to my wife, ‘He’s in our room, he’s in our room,’” Giles remembers. “She said, ‘Who’s in our room?’ I said, ‘bin Laden.’”

Abduction As A Weapon

06/30/2006
Staff Writer
As far back as the Munich Olympics of 1972, Palestinian terrorists and their supporters have used kidnapping as a political tool, abducting Israeli civilians and soldiers to be used in potential prisoner swaps and to obtain other concessions from Israel. Following is a chronology of prominent Israeli kidnappings and MIA cases: 1972: Members of the Black September terrorist group sneak into the Olympic Village in Munich and take 11 members of the Israeli delegation hostage. All 11 are killed.

New Partnerships For The Needy

04/28/2000
Staff Writer
In the belief that there is an "untapped potential" in terms of synagogue volunteers who wish to help the Jewish poor in their communities but don't know how to start, UJA-Federation is encouraging its agencies to team up with synagogue volunteers. It recently awarded $750,000 to facilitate eight such partnerships.
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