waiter

Serving Up Food With Attitude

04/03/2009

He may be one of the last of a famous breed, but Cliff Fyman, who has worked at Sardi’s for almost two decades, is that beloved icon of New York culture: the Jewish waiter.

A published poet and an accomplished visual artist, Fyman says that a blue-collar job is one that enables him “not to take my job home with me.” He tried bartending, but found that he had to talk too much with the customers and consequently had “no more words left for poetry.”

from “Sardi’s”

04/03/2009

Having nodded hello to the maitre d’ I pass

in rubber yellow rain overalls and gortex boots

over red carpeted floors stained with Manhattans

silverware sparkles on Table 6l the celebrity nook

for the soft-spoken tycoon whose name’s on the truck

that delivers that thin paper The Times is printed on

and who likes a bowl of ice cubes to freshen the Lipton tea

A bald waiter who silently silver spoons the cubes

wonders how old Mr. Baldwin's wife is

Serving Up Food With Attitude

The wisecracking and domineering waiter holds a mythical place in the history of American Jewish restaurants.

04/03/2009
He may be one of the last of a famous breed, but Cliff Fyman, who has worked at Sardi’s for almost two decades, is that beloved icon of New York culture: the Jewish waiter. A published poet and an accomplished visual artist, Fyman says that a blue-collar job is one that enables him “not to take my job home with me.” He tried bartending, but found that he had to talk too much with the customers and consequently had “no more words left for poetry.”

At 100, He’s Still Giving

04/22/2005
Staff Writer
On a Friday in January 1973, Jesse Perlstein retired from his job as a district manager for the Robert Hall men’s clothing chain. The following Monday morning he walked to the Samuel Field Y, a few minutes from his home in Little Neck, Queens, and signed up as a volunteer. The next morning he walked to the Marathon Jewish Community Center, his synagogue a few minutes away, again to volunteer. Thirty years later, Perlstein is still donating his time.

Munich: The Documentary

01/27/2006
Staff Writer
Tony Kushner, one of the screenplay writers for Steven Spielberg's "Munich," explained this week why he portrayed Mossad agents as having regrets and doubts about tracking down and killing the Palestinians who planned the murder of 11 Olympic Israeli athletes in 1972. "I've never killed anyone, but my instincts as a person and a playwright ... suggest that people in general don't kill without feeling torn up about it," he wrote last Sunday in the Los Angeles Times.
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