teacher

Back On Key

02/24/2000
Staff Writer
Ruth Magied sits down at the piano in her Midwood apartment and dives into Beethoven’s “Moonlight Sonata.” Her fingers lightly, fluently, dance over the keys. The music stops after a few minutes and Magied stands up. She turns from the piano, the instrument that filled her childhood, to the topic that occupied her adolescence — pain. “Pain,” she says, “can destroy your brain. It’s like having four root canals that never go away. It’s like having someone hitting you over your head with a frying pan.”

For Now, Hebrew Charter School Is ‘Sababa’

10/14/2009
Associate Editor

Yaron Gal-Zur might as well be a rock star, as far as his adoring first-graders are concerned.

Singing “Bo nireh mi yoshev yafeh,” Hebrew for “come, let’s see who is sitting nicely,” he ushers his blue-and-white clad brood from their round tables and brand-new blue chairs to a rug and asks them, in Hebrew, how they are.

Yaron Gal Zur’s first graders are quickly absorbing Hebrew. “My kid comes home and he’s just running to do his homework,” says o

A Lesson In Politics

01/23/2008
Staff Writer
Binyamina, a town near Haifa, and its most famous native son, have both grown over the last six decades. Binyamina’s most famous native son is now Israel’s prime minister. Ehud Olmert returned to his childhood elementary school this week and gave a third-grade class a surprise 40-minute lesson on civics on Tu b’Shevat and the Knesset’s 59th anniversary.

Protecting A Legacy

02/01/2000
Staff Writer
For 13 years the Jewish Foundation for the Righteous, a now-independent organization, has provided moral and financial support to non-Jews who risked their lives to save Jews during the Holocaust. As the generation of rescuers passes away, the foundation faces the problem of how to continue to honor their memory. Its solution: education.

Are Scaled-Down Yeshivas A Bargain?

05/13/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
Forget the sports teams, the debating club, or the science lab. Get used to a more crowded classroom, with only one teacher. And if there are any computers, they won’t be state-of-the-art. Welcome to the low-cost, no-frills yeshiva, an idea whose time may have come in this era of financial struggle, and one that could be a reality as soon as next year. The Orthodox Union says 135 existing schools in North America are in discussions about creating new, discount full-time Jewish education for $6,500 per year, or less than half the current average of $15,000.

Are Scaled-Down Yeshivas A Bargain?

05/13/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
Forget the sports teams, the debating club, or the science lab. Get used to a more crowded classroom, with only one teacher. And if there are any computers, they won’t be state-of-the-art. Welcome to the low-cost, no-frills yeshiva, an idea whose time may have come in this era of financial struggle, and one that could be a reality as soon as next year. The Orthodox Union says 135 existing schools in North America are in discussions about creating new, discount full-time Jewish education for $6,500 per year, or less than half the current average of $15,000.

Special Trust For Day Schools

07/02/1999
Staff Writer
Observing that more and more grandparents are quietly paying their grandchildren's Jewish day school tuition, UJA-Federation has announced a program under which grandparents can underwrite not only their grandchild's Jewish education but those of other youngsters: at no additional cost. "We really want to make what is happening more formal and to make it financially beneficial for grandparents," said Alisa Rubin Kurshan, executive director of Jewish Educational Planning and Continuity.

Search For The Best And Brightest

10/31/2003
Staff Writer
It has been tried many times before, but the organizers of a new initiative to recruit and retain top Jewish educators insist that this time their efforts will pay off. What's changed, they say, is that a growing number of people are choosing their professions based on how rewarding they are personally rather than monetarily.

Protein Power

01/03/2003
Staff Writer
For the second year in a row, two seniors at the Stella K. Abraham High School for Girls in Hewlett Bay Park, L.I., were national finalists in the prestigious Siemens Westinghouse Competition in Math, Science and Technology. But this time, it was not necessary to explain their need to make their presentation before the Sabbath and for glatt kosher food.

When The Levee Breaks (Or, When The Levys Go Broke)

Tuesday, May 5th, 2009

The din has turned into a roar.

 

People who once quietly murmured about the tuition crisis are now shouting. Many who once casually flirted with the idea of putting their children in public school are filling out the paperwork.

 

In the best economic times it was difficult for Jewish families to find $30,000-$40,000 to educate their kids Jewishly full-time. Now it’s become the Herculean task that some are staring to see as Sisyphean.

 

Syndicate content