Staff Writer

Reaching Out In Battle Against Hate

12/24/2004
Staff Writer

In the highly charged political and religious climate of France, the country’s influential Jewish student union has been on the front lines of the fight to beat back hate.It made world headlines this year when it launched its controversial, and since pulled, advertising campaign with the words “Dirty Jew” scrawled in graffiti-like script over the images of Jesus and Mary.

Where Smoking Is Still Allowed

01/20/2006
Staff Writer

The sign above the little red dispenser asks patrons to take a number, and when the store is crowded, they do. Make no mistake about it, though, Russ & Daughters’ customers are never treated like numbers. Salespeople at the venerable Lower East Side smoked fish purveyor tend to know the name of their customers’ children and grandchildren, the names of their parents and grandparents.

Recruiting For The Classroom

12/24/2004
Staff Writer

At a time when the Jewish community was hard-pressed to recruit and retain educators because of meager salaries and benefits, and perceived low prestige, the Coalition for the Advancement of Jewish Education was designing a weeklong program introducing college students to the advantages of pursuing careers in Jewish education.Fifteen years later the Schusterman College Program, as the CAJE course is now called, released a study showing that 70 percent of alumni are employed in Jewish education or Jewish communal services, or they are planning to enter those fields.

Band-Aid For Israel

02/20/2004
Staff Writer

The weeks following Purim are some of most tense for me. It’s not the third-quarter homework that has suddenly piled up or the post-holiday letdown or the sugar crash or the fact that I suddenly realize I’ve run out of Smarties, but the dread of the impending doom of the event lying before me: Pesach.

Let Freedom Ring, Again

Staff Writer
03/17/2010

 Like buds on a tree, new Passover Haggadot are a sure sign of spring. The most-published book in the Jewish community, the Haggadah appears in a variety of forms every year, appealing to the scholar and the beginner, the artist and the historian, the child and the senior citizen.

 

Rabbi Norman Lamm’s Haggadah, above, presents a philosophical look at the seder’s dual themes of slavery and freedom.

A DIY Passover

Staff Writer
03/17/2010

 You’re already spending a fortune on matzah — no need to empty your wallet on small trinkets to ensure the kids stay up long enough to find the afikoman. Here, moms, grandmothers, and educators share their favorite low-cost and even free ideas for spicing up the seder experience. 

From Plates To Plagues

Staff Writer
03/17/2010

 From the asking of the Four Questions to the search for the afikoman, Passover is undoubtedly a holiday geared toward children. So this Passover, choose a gift for the host that will delight the children at the table. Attending an adult-only seder? These children-friendly gifts will bring out the curious kid in all of us. 

 

Frogs

Is It Really Kosher?

Staff Writer
03/17/2010

 Is quinoa acceptable for Passover dining? Not everyone agrees.

The Orthodox Union doesn’t give it a green light but suggests that “individuals ask their own rabbi for guidance on home use.”

The Macaron: Dessert Liberation

Associate Editor
03/17/2010

 Finally, a trendy dessert that is kosher for Passover.

Parisian macarons, delicate and chewy cookies made from egg whites, nut flour or coconut, and sugar, are being touted as the heirs to the “Sex And The City”-fueled cupcake craze.

Touted as heirs to "Sex and the City" - fueled cupcake craze

Out Of South Africa

Whether in “The Nose” or his stop-animation,
artist William Kentridge’s work is unmistakably Jewish.

03/11/2010
Staff Writer

The Museum of Modern Art’s new retrospective of the work of the South African artist William Kentridge is organized around five themes. “Themes” is something of a misnomer, though, since the five sections of the show coalesce around what might more accurately be described as “distinct bodies of work.” Either way, several themes (and certainly more than five) recur in many sections, with at least one being very hard to ignore: Jewishness, an omnipresent feature throughout Kentridge’s oeuvre.

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