spokesman

The Day The Music Died?

09/26/2003
Staff Writer
Twenty-nine years ago, Brooklynite Nate Sheff went on his first date with a girl named Mimi. He took her to The Bottom Line Cabaret, a hip, intimate and affordable new venue for live music on the corner of West Fourth Street, in the then-desolate West Village. Folk-rocker Eric Anderson was headlining. There was no drink minimum. A few weeks ago, Sheff took his and Mimi's elder daughter Shana and her husband to the Bottom Line for a WFUV-FM listening party. Sheff spotted Bottom Line co-owner and Brooklyn native Allan Pepper at the door.

Foxman: Gibson Spewing 'Anti-Semitism'

09/19/2003
Staff Writer
Mel Gibson's mouth has turned into a lethal weapon. So suggests Abraham Foxman, national director of the Anti-Defamation League, following a series of published and oral comments made by the award-winning Hollywood actor and director concerning his controversial upcoming movie about the death of Jesus of Nazareth. "Recent statements by Mel Gibson paint the portrait of an anti-Semite," Foxman told The Jewish Week Tuesday.

More Free-Speech Furor In N.J.

07/25/2003
Staff Writer
When New Jersey Gov. James McGreevey didn't like what state Poet Laureate Amiri Baraka had to say about Israelis in a poem about 9-11, he took action. McGreevey, with the nearly unanimous support of the state Legislature, abolished the state-funded post through budget cuts several weeks ago to get rid of Baraka. In recent weeks McGreevey has said he didn't like the "abhorrent" views of a Rutgers University pro-Palestinian student group that is sponsoring a national conference in October at the state-financed institution.

Stress On The Strasse

03/07/2003
Staff Writer
Berlin: It was a scene dripping with historical irony. On a street in this transformed former capital of Nazi Germany, a German man this week approached Philadelphia Rabbi Jacob Herber, here as part of a delegation of American spiritual leaders, and advised him to remove his kipa, fearing for his safety. "He said, 'Sir, do you have to wear that,' " Rabbi Herber related. "It's very dangerous here because of Muslims." "I was surprised," the rabbi said. "The fact that a German is protecting a Jew from a Muslim was unexpected."

Israel's Visa Policy Rapped By Church

02/26/2003
Staff Writer
Israel's Ministry of Interior for nearly two years has refused to grant or renew visas for Christian clergy and other religious officials, an apparent violation of international religious freedom agreements, The Jewish Week has learned. Critics of the policy, which has prompted rising anger and frustration among Christian leaders, are blaming Shas, the fervently Orthodox Sephardic political party, which has been running the Interior Ministry.

Torahs Missing In Riverdale

04/28/2000
Staff Writer
Police are investigating the theft of two Torah scrolls, taken about a week apart, from two synagogues in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. Both Torahs were discovered missing as much as a month ago but were reported stolen only recently, police said. A Torah stolen March 24 from the Riverdale Jewish Center on Independence Avenue wasn't reported until April 12, a police spokesman said.

'Historic' Apology

09/17/1999
Staff Writer
While recovering from surgery to remove a brain tumor earlier this month, Cardinal John O'Connor composed his annual New Year's letter to his many friends in the New York Jewish community. In fact, the 79-year-old leader of New York City Catholics has been sending heartfelt holiday greetings twice a year (on Rosh HaShanah and Passover) to Jewish leaders for at least 10 years.

The Millennial Top 10

09/10/1999
Staff Writer
Can you name the Top 10 religion stories of the past 1,000 years? As the second millennium rushes to a close, the people at "Religion & Ethics Newsweekly," the PBS TV show, decided to compile such a daunting list. The results, selected by staff after consultation with scholars, are a fascinating journey through the world's significant religious developments: many of which have resulted in untold pain and suffering. Jews were profoundly affected by virtually all of these stories. Presented in chronological order they are:

Four Convicted In New Square Scam

01/29/1999
Staff Writer
The son of the founder of the chasidic village of New Square was among four men convicted this week of stealing more than $11 million from federal education, housing and social service benefits programs in a decade-long scam. A federal jury in White Plains deliberated five days before reaching the verdict on three men from the Rockland County village and one man from Brooklyn.

Split On Jerusalem

01/28/2000
Staff Writer
When the small Jewish Peace Lobby released a petition signed by 300 liberal rabbis calling for Israel to share Jerusalem in a peace settlement, the response could have been: So what? What’s news about a group of Conservative, Reform and Reconstructionist rabbis advocating a view many experts privately say is inevitable? Not to mention that 800 other non-Orthodox rabbis refused to sign the document.
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