Spiritual Leader

Black, Jewish And Proud

01/21/2009
Assistant Managing Editor
Rabbi Capers Funnye Jr. is spiritual leader of the 200-member Beth Shalom B’nai Zaken Ethiopian Hebrew Congregation in Chicago. A Jew By Choice, he is active not only in relations between blacks and Jews but in reaching out to black Jewish communities around the world. And as a first cousin, once removed to First Lady Michelle Obama, Rabbi Funnye (pronounced Fun-AY) had a front seat to American history unfolding.

No Country For Old (Or Young) Rabbis

Three suburban spiritual leaders strike out on big questions in new Coen Brothers satire.

09/30/2009
Staff Writer

Michael Stuhlberg as the Job-like Larry Gopnik in “A Serious Man.”At the center of Joel and Ethan Coen’s new film, “A Serious Man,” which opens on Friday, is a very weighty matter. A Jewish physics professor, Larry Gopnik, faces a string of woes — his wife leaves him for a colleague; he accidentally kills that colleague in a car crash; his brother shows up, homeless, looking for a place to stay; and so on. Why him? To answer the question, the Coen’s send Larry to three rabbis, each one promising the answer to his eternal question.

That quest for enlightenment is a bit what it’s like interviewing the Coens. A brigade of publicists courts you weeks in advance, each new e-mail enticing you for the next: the first one promises you the interview;
the second that the interview will be in person. In subsequent e-mails you learn the day, time, place, and finally receive one last note: arrive early, you have only 15 minutes.

Remember Who Died, Remember Who Did It

Friday, September 11th, 2009 Here’s something from JINSA (The Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs) regarding 9-11 memorials, and what is all-too-often going unspoken by politicians. But what American politicians are too politically correct to say is, in fact, being said in the Arab media, as in this column from Al-Sharq Al-Awsat.   And in memory of those who died, here’s something from The Jewish Week archives (9/8/06):

A Helping Hand

06/23/2006
Staff Writer
The news was devastating. Sandi Frank and her husband, Kenneth, had just been told that a rare form of cancer was spreading through the body of their 9-month-old son, Max. Beside themselves, they reached out to family and friends for support. One of those friends turned to Lori Hardoon, director of the Partners in Dignity Program, who immediately drove from her office in Syosset to Schneider Children's Hospital in New Hyde Park, where the Franks were caring for their son.

Carlebach Back On The Bima

06/20/2003
Associate Editor

The Carlebach Shul was never afraid of broken hearts, but the last decade or so have tested the small shul on West 79th Street.
The shulís rebbe, Shlomo Carlebach ó the musical genius the congregation shared with the world ó went to the Other World in 1994. Rabbi Elichaim Carlebach, his twin brother who led the shul in Shlomoís frequent absences, died in 1990.
Rabbi Sam Intrator, Shlomoís closest aide, filled the void for a few years but left in search of other projects several years ago.

Patrons Of The Heart

09/10/1999
Staff Writer
Simy, a 75-year-old woman who was "well off" financially until four years ago, found herself alone and virtually penniless when her husband of 50 years dumped her for their 20-year-old housekeeper. "I couldn't believe he would throw away 50 years for a young kid," she says of her husband, a retired engineer. "And she had an infant. ... He's 85 years old!" Kicked out of her Queens home, Simy found a room in a private home on Long Island. "My Social Security payment covers the rent," she says.

Suffolk Hit With Two More Bias Attacks

09/10/1999
Staff Writer
The tires of three cars parked at the South Huntington (L.I.) Jewish Center were slashed while their owners attended pre-High Holy Day services Saturday night, and a few hours later in Centereach, L.I., other vandals scrawled swastikas and anti-Semitic and anti-black epithets on a public school.

Westchesterís ëGolden Ageí

08/15/2003
Associate Editor
Suddenly in Jewish Westchester, land of spacious homes and ample backyards, nothing seems to fit. Westchesterís Jews, once limited by upper-crust restrictions, are experiencing a 40-percent population surge in the past 10 years, only to find that their infrastructure of schools and shuls now seems too small, tight around the seams.

Across The Great Divide

09/03/2008
Associate Editor
In a synagogue library in northern Westchester, a dozen senior citizens sit around a long table discussing current events. In a temple conference room on the Upper West Side, a young family talks about the tensions raised by a child’s serious illness. In the meeting room of a Long Island JCC, a group of recent widows share photographs and memories of their late husbands.
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