sociologist

What Passover Tells Us About Peoplehood

03/24/2010

 For the longest time, Jewish peoplehood was lived rather than discussed. But no longer.

Ever since the Israelites fled Egypt and crossed the Red Sea in miraculous fashion — a seminal act in Jewish history commemorated and celebrated in the upcoming Passover seders — the Jews have been a nation and a people.

Gary Rosenblatt

The Glass Pulpit

08/06/2004
Staff Writer

Female rabbis in the Conservative movement face obstacles to career advancement not unlike those encountered by women in other historically male-dominated professions.

A new report shows that women rabbis earn $77,000 annually on average, while men make about 50 percent more, earning an average of $119,000 per year.
The study also found that women tend to lead smaller and less populous congregations, and hold fewer influential non-pulpit positions than do their male counterparts.

The Way We Were

02/04/2005
Staff Writer

Lubartovska Street circa 1937 was a vibrant and predominantly Jewish thoroughfare in the industrial city of Lublin, Poland. Men wearing top hats and well-coiffed women shared the cobblestone artery with horse-drawn carriages. Yiddish and Polish signage advertised kosher restaurants, hardware stores and lingerie boutiques.

Israeli Arabs Buck Leaders On National Service

02/27/2008
Israel Correspondent

Tel Aviv — A government program to encourage volunteer work by Arab Israelis as a substitute for army enlistment enjoys wide support among the country’s one-fifth minority, despite a campaign by Arab political leaders to discourage youths from participating.

According to a survey released this week by University of Haifa sociologist Sammy Smooha, support for the national service project among Arab youths and the general Arab Israeli population runs between 75 to 80 percent.

Has Makor Found Its Groove?

10/06/2000
Staff Writer

Leaving a board of directors dinner last Thursday night, Michael Steinhardt strolled from the cafe to see what the kids were up to in the chic jazz club in his brainchild Makor. Rob Tannenbaum and Sean Altman's Jewish singer-songwriter showcase "What I Like About Jew" was in full swing, the clever a cappella group Minimum Wage trying its best to amuse.

"Are you Jewish?" Steinhardt asked The Jewish Week, scanning the crowd, a product of his $11 million gift. "Do you want to meet a girl and get married tonight?"

Still Redundant After All These Years?

National organizations press their cases for relevancy anew.

01/06/2010
Editor and Publisher

A report has been commissioned by the national policy-making body on Jewish community relations to study the relationship between and among the top national defense agencies — including the American Jewish Committee, American Jewish Congress and Anti-Defamation League — specifically dealing with longstanding complaints about their “duplication, excessive competition, lack of coordination and actual conflict.”

But before you breathe a sigh of relief and think to yourself, “it’s about time,” let me point out that the report in question was commissioned in January 1950, exactly 60 years ago this week.

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Has Makor Found Its Groove?

10/06/2000
Staff Writer
Leaving a board of directors dinner last Thursday night, Michael Steinhardt strolled from the cafe to see what the kids were up to in the chic jazz club in his brainchild Makor. Rob Tannenbaum and Sean Altman's Jewish singer-songwriter showcase "What I Like About Jew" was in full swing, the clever a cappella group Minimum Wage trying its best to amuse.

YU's Challenge From Right

06/09/2000
Staff Writer
Yeshiva University is facing an aggressive challenge to its standing as the primary facility where Orthodox high school boys can attend college while continuing intensive Jewish studies. In recent weeks, two rabbis and two professors have defected from YU's Washington Heights campus in Upper Manhattan to join the soon-to-be opened Lander College for Men, being built on seven acres in Kew Gardens Hills, Queens.

All The King’s Men

08/22/2001
Staff Writer
When two Jewish songwriters teamed up with a former “Shabbos goy” in 1956, it helped change the face of popular music. The “Shabbos goy” was Elvis Presley (who died 24 years ago last week). When Elvis covered “Hound Dog,” a rhythm-and-blues song composed by Mike Stoller and Jerry Leiber — originally recorded in 1953 by Big Mama Thornton — it propelled the young Presley’s career to new heights. But perhaps equally as important, it brought Leiber and Stoller to the attention of top music executives.
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