Singer

Isaac Bashevis Singer on Shabbat

04/28/2010

 The Friday evening meal was over, but the candles were still burning in the silver candlesticks. A cricket chirped behind the stove, and the wick in the lamp made a slight sucking sound as it drew up the kerosene. On the covered table stood a crystal decanter with wine and a silver benediction cup, an engraving of the Wailing Wall upon it; near them lay a bread knife with a mother-of-pearl handle and a challah napkin, embroidered in golden thread. 

Jewish Music That Doesn’t Kid Around

With her ‘Shir Fun’ classes and albums, singer Dafna Israel-Kotok
is at the forefront of a new type of Jewish children’s edu-tainment.

04/13/2010
Associate Editor

On a Wednesday morning shortly before Passover, in a sunny room overlooking the Henry Hudson Parkway, Dafna Israel-Kotok is in her element.

Joyously shaking her long, straight black hair as she plays guitar and sings for about 10 small children and their moms, the 30-something Sabra musician freely alternates between English and her native Hebrew.

Dafna Israel-Kotok: Kids music “you can grow with.” Photo courtesy of Shir Fun

Stanton Street Back To Life

09/17/2004
Staff Writer

Elissa Sampson and her husband, Jonathan Boyarin, longtime members of the Stanton Street Shul, held a blue paper napkin between them as they twirled to the music of the four-piece klezmer band hired by the synagogue for the afternoon.

Art After The Crime

09/21/2001
Staff Writer

In the aftermath of last week’s deadly terror attack, all eyes focused on the fervent rescue effort in Lower Manhattan. With thousands of people buried under mountains of steel and concrete, cultural enterprise suddenly seemed frivolous and art openings, lectures, parties and awards ceremonies nationwide were canceled or postponed.

Into The Mystic

05/02/2003
Staff Writer

The models and movie stars filing past the phalanx of flashbulbs at the New Museum last week had not come to see the latest exhibition of contemporary art or next fall's fashions. They had been invited to the book launch party for "The 72 Names of God: Technology for the Soul," the latest publication from the Kabbalah Centre International.

Israeli Arts, N.Y. Venue

01/24/2003
Staff Writer

With empty seats and shrinking budgets, and virtual boycotts from some venues abroad, Israel's performing arts scene has had it rough the last two years. But not Vertigo Dance Company.

Tribute To ‘The King Of Cantors’

12/19/2003
Special To The Jewish Week

It is one of the greatest singing voices of the 20th century. It could be an earthy baritone, a powerhouse tenor, a piercing falsetto.

But it wasn’t the voice that made Yossele Rosenblatt “the king of cantors,” as he was so often called.

“When he sang, the soul came out,” Cantor Benny Rogosnitzky says. “He did it as a calling, that’s what comes through his singing.”

Sing, Sing A (Yiddish) Song

10/18/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Imagine yourself onstage with a hard-rocking, all-star klezmer ensemble. You’re singing Yiddish classics with great voices like Adrienne Cooper, Basya Schechter and Debbie Friedman, and 500 people are cheering.

Sounds exhilarating, nu? Or maybe a little scary?

Would it help if the 500 people were singing along with you?

“Well, a conservative estimate would say that between 60 and 70 percent of the people were singing,” says Zalmen Mlotek.

Mamele Theresa

08/17/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

It probably started on those long car rides to the Canadian Rockies.

“We would go every Sunday, and my mother would sing ‘Rumenia, Rumenia’ and songs like that,” recalls Theresa Tova, who will play two free concerts in the New York area this week.

Eventually, Tova would sing along. She discovered that she had a powerful voice. As she pursued a career as an actress, it became another helpful item in her theatrical toolkit.

A Soldier’s Story

06/22/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

On the eve of Israel Independence Day in 1967, Dov Lichtenberg went with friends to the Israel Song Festival in Jerusalem. There, Naomi Shemer’s new song, "Jerusalem of Gold" was first performed by an unknown young singer named Shuli Natan. Later, after midnight, the 25-year-old student received word of his mobilization for army service from a colleague at the university. "It’s not a drill; it’s a real war," he said to the person who handed him the order.

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