Rabbi

A Woman For HUC

12/15/2006
Editor & Publisher
Barbara Friedman, recently elected as the first woman to chair the board of governors of the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion , remembers how she first became involved in volunteer work for the 131-year-old Reform seminary. She was on a UJA-Federation of New York committee discussing allocations to Jewish summer camps and was struck by one woman’s suggestion that priority be given to the Orthodox camps because “at least their grandchildren will be Jewish,” Friedman recalls.

‘Taking To The Streets’ For Agunot

02/16/2007
Editor & Publisher
Tova Hartman, a professor of education at Hebrew University specializing in gender studies, seemed to capture the mood of the large audience at the opening plenary of the 10th annual conference of JOFA, the Jewish Orthodox Feminist Alliance, on Sunday morning when she proclaimed: “We don’t have to prove anything to anyone anymore.”

Syrian Community Moving To Limit Damage After Sting

07/28/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
The Syrian Jewish community, based in Brooklyn and the seaside town of Deal, N.J., acted swiftly this week to control the fallout from money-laundering allegations against four prominent rabbis — charges that could put some of its major institutions under scrutiny.

After Fraud, A Call For Compassion

06/24/2009
Assistant Managing Editor
Rabbi Allen Schwartz recalls Chaim Regensberg as a family man who hosted fundraisers in his Upper West Side home for charities in Israel or for Congregation Ohab Zedek, where he was an active member. “I always thought he was an honest guy, upright in all areas,” said Ohab Zedek’s rabbi, who has known Regensberg for about 10 years. “But something happened, he got in over his head and instead of coming clean immediately, it got worse.”

How Bad Is The Day School Crisis?

05/27/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
While no one can deny that yeshivot and day schools and the parents who utilize them are in a crisis over the skyrocketing cost of full-time Jewish education, there is no consensus about how unique and how critical that crisis is. And even less agreement on where to focus solutions. That schism was apparent at a forum co-sponsored by The Jewish Week and the Jewish Values Network in Midtown last week, as three rabbis with firsthand knowledge of the crisis shared ideas.

Are Scaled-Down Yeshivas A Bargain?

05/13/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
Forget the sports teams, the debating club, or the science lab. Get used to a more crowded classroom, with only one teacher. And if there are any computers, they won’t be state-of-the-art. Welcome to the low-cost, no-frills yeshiva, an idea whose time may have come in this era of financial struggle, and one that could be a reality as soon as next year. The Orthodox Union says 135 existing schools in North America are in discussions about creating new, discount full-time Jewish education for $6,500 per year, or less than half the current average of $15,000.

Are Scaled-Down Yeshivas A Bargain?

05/13/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
Forget the sports teams, the debating club, or the science lab. Get used to a more crowded classroom, with only one teacher. And if there are any computers, they won’t be state-of-the-art. Welcome to the low-cost, no-frills yeshiva, an idea whose time may have come in this era of financial struggle, and one that could be a reality as soon as next year. The Orthodox Union says 135 existing schools in North America are in discussions about creating new, discount full-time Jewish education for $6,500 per year, or less than half the current average of $15,000.

Downsizing Reform

03/11/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
In the latest sign of the faltering economy’s impact on religious life, America’s largest Jewish denomination is gearing up for a major restructuring of its professional leadership that will result in some 60 layoffs across the country in a bid to slash spending by 20 percent.

Behind Chabad Fundraising, A Stealth Security Campaign

12/10/2008
Assistant Managing Editor
In the weeks since the Mumbai terrorist attack, the Chabad movement has directed contributions from supporters primarily to two campaigns: One to aid the child whose emissary parents were slain, and another to rebuild the badly damaged outreach center and re-establish operations there, which could cost as much as $1 million, according to a Chabad estimate. But at the same time, some Chabad leaders are acting on their own to secure funds and resources to make dozens of Chabad houses in far-flung outposts safer.

Silver Survives, Felder Loses

09/10/2008
Assistant Managing Editor
After enduring a scathing campaign against him in the press and on the streets of the Lower East Side, Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver easily survived a primary challenge, his first in over 20 years, by two political novices on Tuesday, while another veteran legislator, state Sen. Martin Connor, lost the Democratic Senate nomination in Brooklyn to a challenger backed by U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer. The victor of that primary, Daniel Squadron, is a former Schumer staffer and transportation advocate who was also backed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg.
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