Rabbi

Video Haggadahs

There are thousands of Passover Haggadahs that have been published throughout the world. And with the increasing popularity of the Internet, new forms of haggadot are being created each year.

This year's Passover, which concluded a few short days ago, saw the return of the Facebook Haggadah as well as some attempts at using Twitter to create a Passover Tweder.

Should I Keep An Undeserved Bonus?

04/09/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

 Q. My boss has decided to give me a big bonus for something I only helped with; another worker deserves it more than I do. But I need the money, and she is pretty well off. What's the right thing to do?

 A. Maybe your contribution was more integral to the success of the project than you realize. But, regardless, you should be forthcoming. Not only does our tradition demand honesty in how we conduct business, but it's really the most practical professional decision you can make.

Rabbi Joshua Hammerman

Five uses for leftover matzah

Okay, you miscalculated, and you have a few extra boxes of Passover matzah cluttering your cupboard. Maybe a few dozen.

And let's face it: if you have to choke down another bite of matzah, you're going to hurl. So what to do with the leftovers?

We asked Jewish Week blogger Rabbi Jason Miller, and he offered these "helpful" suggestions - tongue firmly in cheek, maybe stuck there by all the matzah goo:

- Give it to a blind person to read

- Crumble, add water and fill in the cracks in the sidewalk

- Use it as packing material

Kyrgyz Jews hold breath amid upheaval

04/08/2010
JTA

MOSCOW (JTA) – As the capital of Kyrgyzstan erupted in violence Wednesday, members of the Central Asian nation’s small Jewish community held their breath and sat tight.

The ORT school in the capital, Bishkek, shuttered its doors, sending students home just as they were returning from their Passover break. With public transportation suspended and the city in disarray, only three people made it to morning services at the local synagogue. Meanwhile, Jewish community leaders exchanged frantic phone calls, updating each other about the situation on the street.

Conservative Judaism And Kentucky

 This weekend I am heading south to Louisville, Ky., where I will be the Dave and Reva Kahn scholar-in-residence at Keneseth Israel Congregation, a Conservative synagogue.

It’s my first “scholar-in-residence” gig, and the fact that a Conservative shul sought me out for this honor is significant. While the Reform movement has for decades promoted outreach to interfaith families, the Conservative movement long held to a traditional, anti-intermarriage stance. As recently as two years ago, the Rabbinical Assembly of Conservative Judaism had a policy barring intermarried Jews and their spouses from publicly addressing its conventions.

Rabba’s Bat Mitzvah

04/07/2010

 I offer the following in response to your editorial regarding Rabbi Avi Weiss (“Orthodox Women Rabbis,” March 12).

Saudi Arabian Cleric Wants To Broadcast From Israel

Israeli officials in bind about planned visit by sheik with popular TV show.

04/07/2010
Israel Correspondent

 Jerusalem — The Israeli government will have a tough choice to make if a Saudi cleric with a popular TV show makes good on his promise to broadcast from Jerusalem.  

On Sunday Sheik Mohammed al-Areefi, a Muslim cleric who hosts a program with many young viewers, announced that he would be in Jerusalem next week, a claim that caught Israeli officials, and at least some Muslim officials, completely off-guard. 

Sheik Mohammed el-Areefi

Regrettable Moments and Jewish Do-Overs (Part 2)

04/07/2010
JInsider

What are the biggest mistakes in Jewish history? We asked Rabbi Charlie Buckholtz, senior editor at the Shalom Hartman Institute and author, to describe regrettable moments in Jewish history where a do-over might have been helpful. Part 1 of our Regrettable Moments series ran a few weeks ago and we received great feedback. Here is Part 2.   What do you think? Any regrets on our regrets? E-mail us at connect@jinsider.com.

Shabbetai Tzvi

Slow Jewish Revival In Gdansk

A Passover seder on the Baltic is a rare chance for isolated Jews to celebrate together.

04/07/2010
Staff Writer

Gdansk, Poland – Marianna Grochola left her home at 11:30 a.m. last Monday for a 6:45 p.m. seder.

A widow and retired accountant, a child survivor of the Holocaust who grew up in communist Poland, Grochola took a bus to her railroad station in Slupsk, a small town 120 miles west of Gdansk. Then she took a slow train north, then walked a few miles from the main railroad station here to the city’s sole extant synagogue, the site of the first-night seder.

Marianna Grochola, travels 120 miles from her small town in northern Poland to a seeder in Gdansk each year.

Homemade Haggadah

 Monday night we attended a very informal seder in the neighborhood in which most of the families were intermarried and/or the children of intermarriage. I was impressed with the Haggadah, “The 30-Minute Seder,” which cleverly packs in all the key seder components, including the third and fourth cups and opening the door for Elijah, BEFORE the meal.

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