professor

Encountering Our Faith Through Serving ‘The Other’

04/01/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

In his recent piece in Commentary magazine, Jack Wertheimer, a professor of American Jewish history at the Jewish Theological Seminary, tackled a very worthy and critical topic: the disturbingly high cost of Jewish life in America. Unfortunately, he also introduced a puzzling straw argument that the Jewish community’s embrace of service and service-learning programs has undermined its ability to make day school education, Jewish camping, synagogue dues and JCC membership more affordable.  

Dan Senor Rules Out Senate Bid

03/26/2010
Assistant Managing Editor

Dan Senor, an investment manager and former George W. Bush administration official who had been courted by Republicans to run for Senate in New York this year, has decided to sit it out.

In a statement released Thursday Senor, 38, said he seriously considered a race against Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand this fall.

What Passover Tells Us About Peoplehood

03/24/2010

 For the longest time, Jewish peoplehood was lived rather than discussed. But no longer.

Ever since the Israelites fled Egypt and crossed the Red Sea in miraculous fashion — a seminal act in Jewish history commemorated and celebrated in the upcoming Passover seders — the Jews have been a nation and a people.

Gary Rosenblatt

Succeeding Simcha

Voters in Brooklyn's 44th Council District will go to the polls on Tuesday to fill the vacancy that was created when SImcha Felder was named deputy comptroller under John Liu. The winner will either by David Greenfield or Joseph Lazar, and in either case would be the third consecutive Orthodox Jew to represent the district, which includes all of Borough Park and much of Flatbush, and probably has more Jews, most of them Orthodox, than many U.S. cities.

Succeeding Simcha

Voters in Brooklyn's 44th Council District will go to the polls on Tuesday to fill the vacancy that was created when SImcha Felder was named deputy comptroller under John Liu. The winner will either by David Greenfield or Joseph Lazar, and in either case would be the third consecutive Orthodox Jew to represent the district, which includes all of Borough Park and much of Flatbush, and probably has more Jews, most of them Orthodox, than many U.S. cities.

For Bibi, The Political Tightrope Grows More Taut

Reports that Obama hoping prime minister
will have to include Livni in more centrist coalition.

03/18/2010
Israel Correspondent

Tel Aviv — Can Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu — a master tightrope walker — balance between the demands of an angry U.S. administration and the insistent right flank of his governing coalition?
 
Can he advance down the path of negotiations with the U.S. and Palestinians while continuing to hold fast to a coalition dominated by hardliners who are opposed to territorial concessions?
 

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu

A Shiur Of Their Own

02/11/2005
Staff Writer

More than 150 modestly dressed women of all ages packed Schenk Synagogue on Yeshiva University’s Washington Heights campus on Sunday for two lectures that kicked off Midreshet Yom Rishon, a free, weekly learning series exclusively for “the second sex.” Many of the women scribbled notes as YU’s Rosh Kollel, Rabbi Hershel Schachter, discussed Jewish law in the technology age, and Michelle Levine, professor of Torah studies at YU’s Stern College for Women, explored various interpretations of Eve’s creation.“My overriding message,” Levine said, &l

‘I Want To Be Part Of The Land’

01/07/2005
Staff Writer

Jerusalem — Harris Switzman, a 20-year-old college student from Toronto, said birthright israel — the five-year-old program that has sent more than 70,000 young diaspora Jews on free trips to Israel — is more than a gift.

The New Look Of Hebrew Instruction

07/08/2005
Staff Writer

Miriam Harary used to scour New York City bookstores in search of Hebrew textbooks for her students at Hillel High School in Ocean, N.J.Until recently, Hebrew language instruction at Hillel, like dozens of other Jewish day schools, depended largely on the initiative of individual teachers. Yet even the most ambitious instructors often were discouraged by the lack of formal curricula and age-appropriate materials for teaching modern Hebrew to teens.

Syndicate content