producer

Short Fridays

Friday, October 24th, 2008 1: Joe The Plumber Almost all references by leftists (and the ADL) to illegal immigrants simply refer to them as immigrants, their illegal status conveniently ignored. To be against illegal immigration is to branded as anti-immigrant, not anti-illegal immigrant.  

String Theory: Purim gets the puppet treatment

02/13/2009
Special To The Jewish Week
Of all the holidays in the Jewish calendar, Purim is the most theatrical. Throughout the ages, Jewish communities worldwide have naturally performed the story in different ways, in accordance with their own native theatrical traditions. In 18th-century Prague, since itinerant puppeteers provided much of the entertainment seen by the common people, a marionette version of “Queen Esther” was one of the hits of the day.

The Next ‘Crocs,’ Direct From Tel Aviv

07/23/2008
Staff Writer
Sick of donning those goofy, “clown shoes with holes” known as Crocs — but can’t resist the obvious comfort factor? Well, there’s a new plastic sandal in town, and it’s direct from Israel. The Hoki sandal, popularized by Tel Aviv-based former executive producer Shlomit Slavin, has hit boutiques on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, in Brooklyn’s Williamsburg and Park Slope, and can be purchased online at Ravinstyle.com.     

A Jewcy Chanukah

11/29/2002
Staff Writer
Demographers struggling to calculate the nation's Jewish population may get some help from a group of New Yorkers out to market Jewishness as a hip lifestyle: complete with wardrobe.   

Sound and Story

07/25/2003
Staff Writer
At first glance, the Lower West Side of Buffalo is not the most photogenic neighborhood. Seen through the lens of optometrist-turned-photographer Milton Rogovin, however, one of the poorest urban areas in New York State reveals a wealth of individual stories full of dramatic difficulty and bittersweet joy. His portraits of otherwise overlooked subjects (including growing families and longtime friends, steel mill workers, drug abusers, prostitutes and preachers) are currently on view in "The Forgotten Ones," an exhibition at the New-York Historical Society.

The Power Of A Hyphen

01/04/2008
Staff Writer
The 2000-Year-Old Man tells a 350-year-old story — about Jews in the United States. The now-classic comedy routine of Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner, a new PBS documentary suggests, delivers a serious moral message about Jewish identity, about Jewish self-confidence, and about how the act itself became a part of popular American culture.

Goldberg's Variations... Not Bach

05/09/2003
Staff Writer
Legend has it that Johann Sebastian Bach composed the Baroque masterpiece known as the "Goldberg Variations" for an insomniac ambassador to be played on sleepless nights by the diplomat's teenage harpsichordist, Johann Gottlieb Goldberg (1727-1756). The clarinetist Andy Biskin had Bach's work in mind when he playfully named his latest composition "Goldberg's Variations." But the only person losing sleep in this case was the composer himself.  

'Wartime' For Hitler

04/11/2003
Staff Writer
Just as they had won over some of their harshest critics, the people behind an upcoming miniseries about Adolph Hitler find themselves on the defensive again. This week's TV Guide quotes Ed Gernon, who was executive producer of "Hitler: The Rise of Evil," as characterizing the German leader's ascent to power as a cautionary tale for Americans today.

Escape To Africa

03/07/2003
Staff Writer
'Nowhere in Africa," Germany's Oscar entry for this year's best foreign-language film, tells the story of a Jewish family that flees Nazi Germany only to find sanctuary in a different kind of inhospitable terrain. In the film, based on Stefanie Zweig's best-selling memoir "Nirigendwo in Afrika," the Reidlich family (Walter, Jettel and their daughter, Regina) find themselves isolated on a dusty farm in Kenya, besieged by locusts and even detained as resident enemies by the ruling British. Their dislocation nearly breaks the family apart.

Yiddish’s New Frequency

03/01/2002
Staff Writer
Only the gentlest prodding gets Dave Isay and Henry Sapoznik to sputter superlatives about “The Yiddish Radio Project,” the serendipitous act of cultural reclamation they co-produced, which airs on National Public Radio starting this Tuesday. “It’s like opening King Tut’s tomb,” says Sapoznik. “It’s like the Rosetta Stone,” says Isay.
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