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A Charge Of Double Betrayal In Williamsburg

09/05/2008
Special to The Jewish Week

Joel Engelman was 8 years old the first time he was summoned to the principal’s office at his Satmar school in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Not knowing what he might have done to provoke the call, Joel was nervous, as his principal, Rabbi Avrohom Reichman, had a reputation for being strict.

A Charge Of Double Betrayal In Williamsburg

09/05/2008
Special to The Jewish Week

Joel Engelman was 8 years old the first time he was summoned to the principal’s office at his Satmar school in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Not knowing what he might have done to provoke the call, Joel was nervous, as his principal, Rabbi Avrohom Reichman, had a reputation for being strict.

Gays And YU: The Controversy’s Deeper Significance

02/02/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

The debate over Yeshiva University’s recent forum, “Being Gay in the Orthodox World,” concerns not just the specific issue at hand, how Orthodox Judaism should relate to homosexuality. It also, and perhaps even more significantly, concerns the broader question of the current state of Orthodoxy.

Guardians Of The Documents

Israeli, Palestinian archivists honored,
accompanied by high-profile keynoters.

01/28/2010
Staff Writer

On the face it, the CUNY Award for Archivist of the Year doesn’t exactly grab one’s attention. But this year the award, given by the Scone Foundation, and held at the CUNY Graduate Center on 34th Street and Fifth Avenue on Monday night, came with some star power.

Columbia’s Rashid Khalidi, left, and UCLA’s David Myers: Championing the work of archivists, with a little politics thrown in.

Israel And The Tylenol Scare Of ‘82

A PR expert on the Goldstone report, Haiti and what Israel should learn about controlling its message.

01/28/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

In October of 1982, seven people in Chicago died under what at first seemed mysterious circumstances but quickly became linked to cyanide-laced Tylenol that had been placed on drugstore shelves. At the time Tylenol had a whopping 37 percent share of the painkiller market.

I mention it now, in the context of public relations for Israel, because the Tylenol Crisis, as it is called in the industry, is universally considered a benchmark case to study in terms of response to the kind of negative public relations that could have forced the company to fold.

Benefits Of Hebrew School

01/21/2010
Staff Writer

I read your article “Home Is Where The Hebrew School Is” (Dec. 18) with great interest. I agree with the idea that children with special needs require individual and more personal attention while engaged in studies leading up to their bar/bat mitzvah.

APN call to Obama: Pressure Israel, Palestinians; ain’t gonna happen

In the wake of Tuesdays’ disastrous election results for the Democrats, Americans for Peace Now (APN) wants President Obama to ratchet up Israeli-Palestinian peace efforts, even if it means getting  tough with both sides.

Sorry, guys, I know what you’re saying, but it ain’t gonna happen.

High-Wire Act

03/06/2009

Before the Internet Age rendered geography irrelevant to community there was the eruv, the rabbinic response to spatial separation. A strategically placed wire here, a natural hedge border there, the inclusion of a fence or a highway, turns a neighborhood into an imaginary walled community of halachic intent, as such a deliberate remembrance of pre-diasporic Jerusalem.  

On the Meteoric Fall of Elliot Spitzer

03/04/2008
Special to the Jewish Week

What are we to make of Elliot Spitzer’s dramatic fall from grace? How can it be that the man who was swept into office by a record plurality of votes, running as the Mr. Clean who “judged every decision before him simply on the basis of whether it was right or wrong,” as one of his campaign ads suggested, could be so very, very wrong on so basic a principle?

One Interesting Species, We Humans…

12/18/2009
Special to the Jewish Week

I had to laugh yesterday when I heard on the news that Senator Schumer had issued a public (and private) apology for an insult to a flight attendant that he had muttered under his breath.  Evidently she had asked him to turn his cell phone off as the flight was about to take off, and he called her a word that I’d rather not repeat here.  Welcome to the human race, I thought to myself.  We all have our less than wonderful moments.  The measure of who we are is how and whether we own up to them, not whether or not we have them.

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