physician

A Heartbreaking Mission

05/14/1999
Israel Correspondent

Tirana, Albania — Barely six weeks ago, the recreational facility and park grounds known as Piscina, in the nation’s capital, was one of the few places where Albanian families could go for a swim, hike through the forest, or ride in bumper cars.

That was before local authorities turned Piscina into a refugee camp.

Since early April, it has served as a tent city for 2,500 ethnic Albanian refugees forced out of Yugoslavia by the Serbs.

Navigating The Shoals Of Breast Cancer

10/29/2008
Staff Writer
In the early 1990s, two oncologists — troubled by how frustrated and confused their newly-diagnosed breast cancer patients felt — decided to comprehensively address their lists of unanswered questions. The doctors teamed up to publish the first edition of a guidebook to breast cancer in 1992.

After The Screening

05/14/2008
Editorial Intern
After learning about the benefits of genetic screening from her physician, a pregnant woman decides to schedule an amniocentesis test. Doctors carefully screen her amniotic fluid sample, and they determine that her fetus has an extra 21st chromosome — in other words, the child will be born with Down syndrome. The patient instantly faces an emotional quandary: should she go forward with the pregnancy, or should she have an abortion? This kind of thorny ethical question was at the center of a forum on genetic disease forum held May 5 at the JCC in Manhattan.

SPECIAL REPORT A Tale Of Two Cities

09/05/1997
Staff Writer

Hawaiian Gardens, Calif.: Francelia Morales, a 36-year-old Mexican immigrant living in a roach-infested, leaky apartment with mildewed walls, has been thinking a lot about the crisis in the Middle East lately. "I feel a link to the Palestinians I never knew before," she said as she sat with her husband and three children amid the cardboard storage boxes, children's toys and English-language instruction video cassettes that crowd her small living room. Her neighbor from just a few doors down feels similarly.

Longtime Cuban Jewish Leader Dies At 80

03/17/2006
Staff Writer
Dr. Jose Miller, a physician who served as president of Cuba's Jewish community for two decades and shepherded a revival in the country's Jewish life, died Feb. 27 in Havana after a brief illness. He was 80. Dr. Miller's years of leadership coincided with the government's decision in the early 1990s to change its character from atheistic to secular, eliminating the persecution of people who participated in religious activities and allowing the open practice of Judaism and other faiths.

Rabbi Seymour Fox, Conservative Educator, 77

07/21/2006
Staff Writer
Rabbi Seymour Fox, a prominent Jewish educator in the United States and Israel for a half-century, died of heart failure July 10 in his Jerusalem home, two weeks after announcing his plans to retire from administration and return to teaching. He was 77. Known in Israel by his Hebrew name, Shlomo, he had served with the educational Mandel Foundation at the time of his death. A prolific author, he was known as an inspirational teacher and manager.

Dwindling Days Of Awe

09/08/2004
Staff Writer
On Rosh HaShanah will be inscribed and on Yom Kippur will be sealed how many will pass from the earth and how many will be created, who will live and who will die … From the Rosh HaShanah liturgy On these summer days in the late autumn of his life, on the mornings when he feels strong enough, Harold Dubow opens a siddur. Waking late in a living room on the edge of Brooklyn’s Midwood neighborhood, he takes some pills, eats a small cereal breakfast and recites Shacharit from a large-print prayerbook he keeps nearby on a small table.

A Moving Experience

03/01/2002
Staff Writer
Alan Rubin has always worn a kipa, but he says it’s bigger these days. His wife, Debi, has always dressed modestly, but she says she dresses more modestly these days. The couple has always found time for their five children, but they say they find more time these days. These days are the six months since Sept. 11, 2001. The Rubins, who live in Elizabeth, N.J., say they have been on a spiritual journey since 9-11, a path that will end this summer in Jerusalem. The Rubins are making aliyah — because of 9-11.

A Madoff Victim Bailout? I don’t think so

Sunday, March 15th, 2009 James Besser in Washington Just in case you haven’t read enough about mega-swindler Bernie Madoff, check the book-like article about many of his victims in the current Vanity Fair. Needless to say, most of the victims interviewed are Jewish, and the tales are poignant, like the story of the wealthy physician’s widow who invested with Madoff and ended up working as a kind of maid.
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