painter

The Women’s Section

11/28/2007
Jewish Week Book Critic

Enter the room that houses Miriam Stern’s installation piece “Ezrat Nashim” and you’ll be struck by the clusters of women’s figures, 10 in all, standing together in a corner, like oversized paper dolls covered in earth-tone designs.

SPRING ARTS-THEATER LIST

02/13/2009
 “Irena’s Vow.” Tovah Feldshuh moves to Broadway in this play about a Polish Catholic housekeeper who hid Jews in the basement of the Nazi’s officer’s villa in which she worked. Previews March 10th and opens March 29 at the Walter Kerr Theatre. For tickets, $41-$98, call Telecharge at (212) 239-6200.

The Hamische Bohemian

08/23/2002
Staff Writer
When Larry Rivers received the National Foundation for Jewish Culture's Achievement Award in 1991, the painter and jazz musician demonstrated his notorious bad-boy persona.  

Universal Appeal

06/28/2002
Staff Writer
Two uniformed guards recently stopped Michal Rovner as she tried to enter the third-floor galleries at the Whitney Museum of American Art. "We're sorry, ma'am," Rovner said she was told, "the galleries are closed." To get through security, the diminutive Israeli-born artist simply looked up. Taped to the wall (in expectation of an upcoming exhibition) was a sign bearing her name.  

Common Artists, Uncommon Art

01/31/2003
Staff Writer
Its creative ranks include recluses, the insane and former prison inmates, but "Outsider Art" is hardly the exclusive domain of social misfits. A tour through the American Museum of Folk Art or any number of galleries specializing in what is also known as "self-taught art" exposes viewers to a rich field of artists (including a notable number of Jewish painters) who, while untrained, display a talent for visual expression appreciated by connoisseurs and common folk alike.

'To Paint History'

11/07/2003
Staff Writer
When history touched Yonia Fain's life, it hit with gale force. For 30 years he was "dragged by the storm of events over half a world," the Brooklyn-based painter and Yiddish poet once wrote. Between 1923 (when a 9-year-old Fain and his family fled Bolshevik Russia, and 1953) when he settled in New York City: Fain outran Nazi troops in Poland, was imprisoned by the Soviets, escaped to Japan, was deported to China and eventually made his way to safety and artistic success in Mexico.

Faith In Abstraction

10/24/2002
Staff Writer
Museum Mile — the stretch of Fifth Avenue from 82nd Street to 104th — offers an intriguing paradox this fall. The Jewish Museum, at the corner of 92nd Street, is presenting a retrospective of works by a Jewish painter who eschewed Jewish imagery in his embrace of the universal. A few blocks south, the National Academy of Design exhibits the work of a painter who rejected Judaism, but uses explicitly Jewish symbols as expressions of spiritual transcendence.

Return Of The Repressed

11/07/2003
Special to The Jewish Week
Last spring, art curator Michael Auping had the rare experience of witnessing a collision between political power and artistic critique in the newly opened Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas.

Art After The Crime

09/21/2001
Staff Writer
In the aftermath of last week’s deadly terror attack, all eyes focused on the fervent rescue effort in Lower Manhattan. With thousands of people buried under mountains of steel and concrete, cultural enterprise suddenly seemed frivolous and art openings, lectures, parties and awards ceremonies nationwide were canceled or postponed.
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