Major

Studying Hate

Indiana U. launches contemporary anti-Semitism center, the second major academic institution of its kind. Will politics compromise its mission?

02/11/2010
Staff Writer

In recent years, Jewish intellectuals have sometimes bemoaned the anti-Zionist views heard on college campuses, and among liberal intellectuals generally, but have failed to do much about it. But that may be changing.

Last month, the chair of the Jewish studies department at Indiana University in Bloomington, Alvin Rosenfeld, announced the foundation of the Institute for the Study of Contemporary Anti-Semitism. His goal is to study, in a dispassionate, scholarly way, what he thinks is just a new version of a very old kind of hate: anti-Semitism.

Professor Alvin Rosenfeld, who teaches Jewish studies at Indiana University.

Clarke Gets An Earful On Israel

Brooklyn rep backtracks on Gaza
after meetings with Jewish leaders.

02/11/2010
Assistant Managing Editor

After voting with 36 other members of the House in November against a resolution that the Goldstone Report to the UN was unfair to Israel, Brooklyn’s Yvette Clarke reportedly told Jewish leaders in her district that she’d consult with them on Middle East issues in the future.

Rep. Yvette Clarke said letters on Gaza she signed “do not provide a complete, and therefore accurate, picture of the situation.

A Match Made In ... Queens

Novel fundraising approach enables Orthodox day school to thrive.

02/11/2010
Associate Editor

Alan Steinberg likes to call it the “miracle on Grand Central Parkway.”
Last summer, Yeshiva Har Torah, where Steinberg serves as executive vice president, was, like many other Jewish day schools, scrambling to raise funds to compensate for its widening, $400,000 budget gap.

Lucky for them, a donor approached, offering to match all funds raised in the school’s “Mind the Gap” campaign. But there was a catch: every Har Torah family would have to make some sort of contribution, and within 30 days.

Yeshiva Har Torah’s parents rallied together to donate $200,000 to the school, matched by an anonymous donor.

Head Start — And More — For Ethiopian Kids

01/09/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

Rehovot, Israel — Seated in tiny chairs organized in the shape of a horseshoe, 32 kindergarteners watch attentively as their teacher, Vered Reinstein, asks them how to spell the word “Shalom” in Hebrew.  Eager hands wave as Reinstein chooses a boy to pluck the letter “shin” off a felt board, a girl to find the “vav,” until the four-letter word is completed.

Making Strides In Russia?

01/09/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

Olga Glebova identifies herself as part of a distinguished and highly regarded class in Russia, hailing, she says, from “a very old, noble Russian family.” Like much of the country, she’s also Russian Orthodox, a faith whose leaders have often been at odds with Russian Jewry.

But Glebova, an English teacher in Moscow, tries to discuss the Holocaust as much as possible at the high school in which she works.

How Far Can Their Dialogue Go?

11/14/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

For several tense minutes last week, it seemed as if the first “National Summit of Imams and Rabbis” might fail even before it got off the ground.

Both participants and observers waited with bated breath as Sheik Omar Abu-Namous, one of the event’s organizers, called for an Israeli “apology” to the Palestinians, along with some form of compensation for families who lost their land in 1948, the year Israel was established.

Pressure Rising On Russia To Pay Pensions

06/01/2007

 For the first time, a high-level United States government delegation will travel to Moscow to press Russian officials to pay pensions to refugees and immigrants from Russia, and its predecessor, the Soviet Union, now living in the U.S., The Jewish Week has learned. News of the upcoming negotiations — which will be held in the Russian capital next week between a delegation from the U.S.

The Mourning Son

10/02/1998
Jewish Week Book Critic

"For many years I had lived without religion. But I could not have lived without the possibility of religion,” Leon Wieseltier writes in “Kaddish.”

The Great Hate Debate

02/11/2005
Special to The Jewish Week

 Leaders of the fractious Jewish community in Russia are taking opposing positions on whether a vote last week by the lower house of Russia’s parliament to condemn an overtly anti-Semitic statement signed by 19 of its members amounts to progress in the fight against anti-Jewish bigotry.Yet four major Jewish leaders — Chief Rabbis Berel Lazar and Adolf Shayevich; Vladimir Slutsker, president of the Russian Jewish Congress; and Mikhail Chlenov, secretary general of the Eurasian Jewish Congress — agreed in separate phone interviews that the recent upsurge of anti-Semitis

Honoring The Many

11/01/2002
Jewish Week Book Critic

Imre Kertesz, a Hungarian Jew who is this year’s Nobel laureate in literature, often says that he’s a medium of the Holocaust. “Auschwitz speaks through his stories,” a friend of his, the Israeli literary critic and author Shmuel Thomas Huppert, tells The Jewish Week. “His main theme is Auschwitz. He stresses the fact that first of all he’s a writer. He didn’t become a writer because he was in Auschwitz but, by being in Auschwitz, he found his major theme.”

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