Major

Symphony’s New Space

04/05/2002

The surplus capital of the indefatigable 1990s economy may be a memory, but its effects are still being felt in the ongoing expansion of many of New York’s cultural centers, from Jazz at Lincoln Center to the Brooklyn Museum.

Now this trend has reached all the way to West 95th Street. Symphony Space, once housed in an intimate but sticky-floored former skating rink, has recently completed a $12 million renovation. After a nearly two-year closure, the beloved performing arts group officially reopens April 8.

Resolved: Israel Is Still A Jewish State (UPDATED)

Is Israel a Jewish state or the state of the Jewish people?

That’s the question that faced voting representatives at this week’s conference of the Jewish Council for Public Affairs. Many voted in favor of amending the language of a 2008 JCPA resolution in support of a two-state Mideast solution to remove the words Jewish state. The motion, which was not carried, was sponsored by the JCRC of St. Louis.

The Architecture Of Hope

12/27/2002
Staff Writer

Thunderous applause greeted the first proposal for rebuilding the World Trade Center site unveiled last week by seven international design teams at the Winter Garden in the World Financial Center.

The enthusiastic response by the victims' relatives, officials and reporters gathered under the indoor garden's palm trees might have been a collective expression of relief. The initial round of proposals, released in July, had been tossed out for lack of imagination and failure to inspire.

Polanski Gets Personal

12/13/2002
Staff Writer

Roman Polanski's latest feature film is a dramatic account of one man's survival in wartime Warsaw. "The Pianist," which opens Dec. 27, is also a documentary in at least one respect: its star, Adrien Brody, nearly starved himself to portray the Jewish musician and composer Wladyslaw Szpilman, shedding some 30 pounds from his already slender frame as filming progressed.

JDC To Resume Aiding Ethiopians

11/06/1998
Jewish Telegraphic Agency

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee is preparing to return to Ethiopia, just four months after it virtually shut down its operations in the African nation at the request of the Israeli government. Reports of death, illness and impoverished conditions among the thousands of Ethiopians who have flooded into the capital city of Addis Ababa and Gondar City prompted the move by the relief agency.

Will The Circle Be Unbroken?

11/01/2002
Staff Writer

The Workmen’s Circle/Arbeiter Ring started more than a century ago in a tenement on the Lower East Side. It developed over the decades from a mutual-aid society for immigrants into an activist organization bristling with radical ideologies and aimed at promoting secular Jewish education. Next week, the group marks the start of its second century with a celebration of Yiddish culture at Town Hall.

More J Street Silliness

When are Israeli leaders going to get smart about American Jews? Not soon, if their clumsy efforts to brand J Street an anti-Israel group are any measure.

Chumash As Cognitive Dissonance

04/26/2002
Special To The Jewish Week

Is the Torah true? Does the God of Exodus really exist? And if the answer is no, is it a theological catastrophe or business as usual?

These existential questions underlie the striking range of newspaper commentaries on the Conservative movement's impressive new Chumash, Etz Chaim, its first new publication of the Torah and Haftorah readings since the 1930s.

The Art of Tikkun Olam

06/25/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

It’s not often that one visits a contemporary art installation, opens up the comment book, and reads the following: “First of all, I am a broken vessel, a victim of abuse, and I am in the process of healing.” Or: “Today, June 8, makes 7 years since I lost my wife.” Other entries include promises to help woman held in sexual bondage, or work with local schools to improve the quality of education.

Chumash As Cognitive Dissonance

04/26/2002
Special To The Jewish Week

Is the Torah true? Does the God of Exodus really exist? And if the answer is no, is it a theological catastrophe or business as usual?

These existential questions underlie the striking range of newspaper commentaries on the Conservative movement's impressive new Chumash, Etz Chaim, its first new publication of the Torah and Haftorah readings since the 1930s.

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