leader

Rabbis’ Posse Closing In On Avi Weiss

The RCA doesn’t like the way Avi has been spinning things, he’s been talking too loudly and defiantly, saying that he came away with a victory – about anything. So now the word “maharat” has to go, not just “rabba.” Both the RCA and Agudah are in agreement that Hebrew Institute itself will now have to decide if it is Orthodox or not. This is no longer about Avi alone.
 

Yitz Greenberg: The 10 Percent Solution

How far and fast a rabbi can impose change by executive fiat, as if some sort of Zeus? How far can a rabbi get in front of (or behind) his shul to the point where there are far less people supporting him than he supposes? if a shul is Orthodox, how far can a rabbi go beyond the bounds of what would be commonly accepted as Orthodox?

Real Jews aren't afraid of a tea party

The liberal Jewish fear-mongering regarding the Tea Party movement, that somehow this grassroots anti-tax, anti-DC establishment uprising will hurt Jews, minorities, and the conservative wave sweeping the American spirit, is nothing but leftist wishful thinking.

Biden's Israel speech: not a game changer

 So did Vice President Joe Biden accomplish his top goal during this week's Israel visit – reassuring a skeptical Israeli public about the Obama administration's intentions while also reassuring the Palestinians that the administration is still determined to play a role in bringing the two sides back together for serious peace talks?

Arnold Forster, Longtime ADL Leader, Dies

03/11/2010

(JTA) — Arnold Forster, an attorney who had a nearly 60-year career at the Anti-Defamation League, has died.

Forster fought against anti-Semitism and extremism, and advocated for civil rights and the State of Israel. He was 97 when he died Sunday night.

For Youth Groups, Strength In Numbers

Northern Westchester congregations team up
for teen programming.

03/11/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

It’s a perennial challenge: how can congregations keep their teens connected to the Jewish community and involved in Jewish life once the bar/bat mitzvah is over? While many communities have success with vibrant youth groups that attract middle and high school students, the problem for four Conservative congregations in northern Westchester was that none of the congregations, individually, could sustain a viable youth program.

An area teen takes part in an art-as-social-action project.

Presbyterians Seen Renewing Attacks On Israeli Policy

Jewish leaders lash out at new, left-leaning report; cite lack of dialogue with major groups here.

03/10/2010
Staff Writer

ewish community leaders are furious that a committee of the Presbyterian Church USA has lashed out at major American Jewish groups over their Israel policies without ever consulting them.

JCPA's point man on divestment, Ethan Felson, is angered by new report by Presbyterians.

A Jazz Man’s Roots Music

10/22/2004
Managing Editor

Of the elite jazz musicians working in New York, pianist Bruce Barth is probably the only one who can claim a klezmer pedigree.

Barth, 46, who has emerged as one of his generation’s most compelling pianists and will share the stage Monday at Merkin Hall with the legendary Cedar Walton in a two-piano duet, developed an ear for klezmer in high school in Harrison, N.Y. It was then that his brother introduced him to a clique of New York bluegrass musicians, including mandolinist/clarinetist Andy Statman and banjoist Tony Trischka.

Keeping The Faith On The Great Plains

04/29/2005
Managing Editor

Fargo, N.D. — The pioneer Jews who homesteaded on the flat, wind-whipped high plains at the turn of the last century came from foreign lands, beat back bone-rattling prairie winters and eked out a community in hardscrabble farming colonies near here.

They would have recognized a kindred spirit in Biana Shilshtut.A pioneer in her own right, Shilshtut came to North Dakota State University two years ago from half a world away in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, the capital city in the foothills of the mountains of Central Asia.

Rumblings Beneath The Cave Of The Patriarchs

Hebron-related protests subside, but the controversy has not blown over.

03/05/2010
Israel Correspondent

Tel Aviv — The weeklong Palestinian protests over Israel’s decision to designate two shrines in the West Bank as heritage sites subsided this week, but the controversy has not blown over. 

If the government goes through with a plan to renovate religious sites like the Cave of the Patriarchs in Hebron, there is a risk of an even worse upsurge in violence, claimed the leader of a prominent Palestinian clan in the city.

An Israeli border policeman, center, arrests two Palestinian men Sunday. Gali Tibbon/AFP/Getty Images
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