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Poland Grappling With Reparations

07/30/1999
Staff Writer
Polish lawmakers this week began wrestling with a long-delayed World War II property restitution plan, only weeks after 11 Jews filed an unprecedented federal lawsuit in Brooklyn against the Republic of Poland seeking the return of property seized from their families during the Holocaust.

Lanner Out On Bail Pending Appeal

10/11/2002
Staff Writer
A New Jersey appellate court Thursday granted Rabbi Baruch Lanner’s emergency request to be free on bail pending the appeal of his conviction of sexually abusing two teenaged girls while he was their principal in a New Jersey yeshiva high school.

Orthodox Come To Rubashkin’s Defense

As liberal groups hope bank fraud conviction leads to better business practices, Orthodox ones question zeal of prosecution.

11/18/2009
Associate Editor

Sholom Rubashkin, the manager of the now-infamous Agriprocessors kosher slaughterhouse in Iowa, has only completed one of two federal trials, and already — barring a successful appeal — he is looking at a life in prison.

The prospect of such severe punishment — for a man who many credit with making affordable kosher food available in previously underserved markets and for contributing generously to tzedakah, particularly to the Chabad community — has some Orthodox Jews complaining that the kosher meat tycoon is more victim than criminal.

At the same time, liberal Jewish groups that have been critical of the company’s practices — particularly its alleged mistreatment of workers — are hoping the conviction prompts better business practices in the kosher industry and Jewish nonprofit sector.

Prayer And Popularity

Wednesday, October 28th, 2009

I have never prayed as hard or as often in my life as I have over the past few weeks.

 

The Forgotten Olympians

08/06/2004
Staff Writer
In Olympic years, some People of the Book become people of the backstroke, the clean-and-jerk, and the high hurdles. The Games, Summer and Winter, serve as a showcase for the best athletes, Jewish and non-Jewish. From A (Ruth Abeles) to Z (Eli Zuckerman), names like Mark Spitz and Kerry Strug are in the record books as well as Jewish history texts. Beginning with 10 medals won by Jewish athletes at the first modern Olympics in Athens in 1896, Jews have been a steady presence at the international competition.

Passion At The Polls

11/05/2004
Staff Writer
Entering a Borough Park public school early Tuesday, David Tilis was emphatic about his pick for president. “I’m Jewish, so it has to be [George W.] Bush,” said Tilis, 21, a mortgage broker en route to casting his vote for the Republican incumbent. “I don’t understand how any Jew could vote for [Sen. John] Kerry. Yasir Arafat is for him.”

Remember Who Died, Remember Who Did It

Friday, September 11th, 2009 Here’s something from JINSA (The Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs) regarding 9-11 memorials, and what is all-too-often going unspoken by politicians. But what American politicians are too politically correct to say is, in fact, being said in the Arab media, as in this column from Al-Sharq Al-Awsat.   And in memory of those who died, here’s something from The Jewish Week archives (9/8/06):

Staking His Claim

06/25/1999
Staff Writer
When the latest round of talks were held in Jerusalem this week to resolve Nazi-era insurance claims, a prominent New York Jewish leader was seated at the table. But he was not sitting with the victims. "I came into this to try to come up with some basis to move the settlement process forward," explained Kenneth Bialkin, who earlier this year became lead counsel in the talks for Italy's largest insurer, Assicurazioni Generali.

Clash Over Nazi-Era Policies

05/07/2008
Staff Writer
For some Holocaust survivors and their supporters, a Senate subcommittee hearing this week was their last chance to collect on the Nazi-era life insurance policies of their parents. The survivors asked that Congress adopt legislation that would require insurance companies doing business in the United States to publish the names of all policyholders from the pre-war era. If the companies then refused to settle claims on reasonable terms, survivors and their heirs could sue them during the next 10 years.
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